Europe

German Cabinet finalizing details on migrant integration

  • German Chancellor Angela Merkel, right, talks to her office manager Beate Baumann, left, prior to a cabinet meeting as part of a two-day retreat of the German government in Meseberg north of Berlin, Germany, Wednesday, May 25, 2016. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)

    German Chancellor Angela Merkel, right, talks to her office manager Beate Baumann, left, prior to a cabinet meeting as part of a two-day retreat of the German government in Meseberg north of Berlin, Germany, Wednesday, May 25, 2016. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)  (The Associated Press)

  • German Chancellor Angela Merkel closes a door as she arrives for a cabinet meeting as part of a two-day retreat of the German government in Meseberg north of Berlin, Germany, Wednesday, May 25, 2016. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)

    German Chancellor Angela Merkel closes a door as she arrives for a cabinet meeting as part of a two-day retreat of the German government in Meseberg north of Berlin, Germany, Wednesday, May 25, 2016. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)  (The Associated Press)

  • German Chancellor Angela Merkel, front right, and German Minister for Economic Affairs and Energy, Sigmar Gabriel, left, arrive for a press conference after a cabinet meeting as part of a two-day retreat of the German government in Meseberg north of Berlin, Germany, Wednesday, May 25, 2016. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)

    German Chancellor Angela Merkel, front right, and German Minister for Economic Affairs and Energy, Sigmar Gabriel, left, arrive for a press conference after a cabinet meeting as part of a two-day retreat of the German government in Meseberg north of Berlin, Germany, Wednesday, May 25, 2016. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)  (The Associated Press)

Chancellor Angela Merkel's Cabinet is meeting to finalize details of new measures to help deal with the influx of some 1.1 million migrants who were registered entering Germany last year, including getting them into the workforce faster and promoting broader German language skills.

Among other things, the measures being discussed Wednesday foresee expanded orientation courses for migrants and reduced waiting times for integration courses, with a greater emphasis on learning the German language.

To try to avoid migrant ghettos in big cities, the measures would mandate newcomers to stay where they have been officially placed for a minimum of three years unless a job is found that takes them elsewhere.

The proposals also foresee the creation of government-funded jobs for migrants, and relaxed rules on entering the workforce.