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Mud from Brazilian mining dam disaster now spilling into Atlantic Ocean

In this photo released by the official web site of the Brazilian Presidency, President Dilma Rousseff accompanied by Minas Gerais state Gov. Fernando Pimentel, looks out over the area of dam bursts at an iron ore mine, in the southeastern Brazilian state of Minas Gerais, Thursday, Nov. 12, 2015. Last week dam failures unleashed a deadly wave of viscous mud that all but erased a hamlet and contaminated a key river. Rousseff says the mining company, Samarco, will be made to pay for the cleanup. (Roberto Stuckert Filho/Brazil Presidential Press Office via AP)

In this photo released by the official web site of the Brazilian Presidency, President Dilma Rousseff accompanied by Minas Gerais state Gov. Fernando Pimentel, looks out over the area of dam bursts at an iron ore mine, in the southeastern Brazilian state of Minas Gerais, Thursday, Nov. 12, 2015. Last week dam failures unleashed a deadly wave of viscous mud that all but erased a hamlet and contaminated a key river. Rousseff says the mining company, Samarco, will be made to pay for the cleanup. (Roberto Stuckert Filho/Brazil Presidential Press Office via AP)

A torrent of mud unleashed by a dam burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil is contaminating the Atlantic Ocean.

The deadly stain of red mud, water and debris from the Nov. 5 burst at the Samarco mine in the Minas Gerais state all but erased a hamlet there, killing eight people, with another four bodies still unidentified and 11 missing.

The mud flowed downstream into the Doce River, where it devastated wildlife and compromised the drinking water source for hundreds of thousands of people.

The stain flowed through the neighboring Espirito Santo state, reaching the Atlantic over the weekend.

A report Monday in O Estado de S. Paulo daily said the mud had reached a sensitive nature reserve frequented by endangered turtles.

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