World

Nepal says protests over newly adopted constitution are abating, though violence persists

  • Nepalese people cheer as they attend a function held to celebrate the adoption of the country's new constitution in Kathmandu, Nepal, Monday, Sept. 21, 2015. Nepal on Sunday, Sept. 20, 2015, formally adopted a much anticipated and long-delayed constitution that took more than seven years to complete following a decade of political infighting. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)

    Nepalese people cheer as they attend a function held to celebrate the adoption of the country's new constitution in Kathmandu, Nepal, Monday, Sept. 21, 2015. Nepal on Sunday, Sept. 20, 2015, formally adopted a much anticipated and long-delayed constitution that took more than seven years to complete following a decade of political infighting. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)  (The Associated Press)

  • Nepalese policemen chase protesters after they burnt a copy of the new constitution during the protest organized by splinter of the Maoist party, alliance of ethnic group and Madhesi party, in Kathmandu, Nepal, Monday, Sept. 21,2015. Nepal on Sunday, Sept. 20, 2015, formally adopted a much anticipated and long-delayed constitution that took more than seven years to complete following a decade of political infighting. However, security was stepped up across the nation, with smaller political parties and ethnic groups opposing to the new charter and fighting for equal representation in the country’s political structure, which according to them has failed to meet their aspirations. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)

    Nepalese policemen chase protesters after they burnt a copy of the new constitution during the protest organized by splinter of the Maoist party, alliance of ethnic group and Madhesi party, in Kathmandu, Nepal, Monday, Sept. 21,2015. Nepal on Sunday, Sept. 20, 2015, formally adopted a much anticipated and long-delayed constitution that took more than seven years to complete following a decade of political infighting. However, security was stepped up across the nation, with smaller political parties and ethnic groups opposing to the new charter and fighting for equal representation in the country’s political structure, which according to them has failed to meet their aspirations. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)  (The Associated Press)

  • A Nepalese man shouts slogans against the government and the country’s new constitution during the protest organized by splinter of the Maoist party, alliance of ethnic group and Madhesi party, in Kathmandu, Nepal, Monday, Sept. 21,2015. Nepal on Sunday, Sept. 20, 2015, formally adopted a much anticipated and long-delayed constitution that took more than seven years to complete following a decade of political infighting. However, security was stepped up across the nation, with smaller political parties and ethnic groups opposing to the new charter and fighting for equal representation in the country’s political structure, which according to them has failed to meet their aspirations. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)

    A Nepalese man shouts slogans against the government and the country’s new constitution during the protest organized by splinter of the Maoist party, alliance of ethnic group and Madhesi party, in Kathmandu, Nepal, Monday, Sept. 21,2015. Nepal on Sunday, Sept. 20, 2015, formally adopted a much anticipated and long-delayed constitution that took more than seven years to complete following a decade of political infighting. However, security was stepped up across the nation, with smaller political parties and ethnic groups opposing to the new charter and fighting for equal representation in the country’s political structure, which according to them has failed to meet their aspirations. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)  (The Associated Press)

Nepal says protests against its new constitution are abating, just hours after police opened fire on a crowd and injured three in the east of the Himalayan nation.

The Home Ministry said Tuesday that curfews imposed amid weeks of violent demonstrations that left more than 40 dead are now being relaxed in parts of the country.

The violence has alarmed neighboring India, with New Delhi calling its ambassador to report on the situation Monday.

The Nepal Oil Corporation said Indian oil tankers are refusing to enter Nepal because of security concerns, and trucks carrying cargo from India were also stopping short of the border.

While many in Nepal cheered Sunday's adoption of a new constitution after a 10-year effort, some ethnic groups say concerns over defining state borders were ignored.