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2 men claiming they found Nazi train reveal their identities on Polish TV claiming

  • A view of Ksiaz Castle in Walbrzych, Poland, on Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2015. Polish authorities recently said that two unidentified men used radar to locate an armored train deep under the woodlands around Walbrzych, and believe it could be the so-called Nazi “gold train.” Rumors have swirled for decades about the train, also said to be filled with weapons, though there is absolutely no evidence that it ever existed. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)

    A view of Ksiaz Castle in Walbrzych, Poland, on Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2015. Polish authorities recently said that two unidentified men used radar to locate an armored train deep under the woodlands around Walbrzych, and believe it could be the so-called Nazi “gold train.” Rumors have swirled for decades about the train, also said to be filled with weapons, though there is absolutely no evidence that it ever existed. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)  (The Associated Press)

  • A view of a tunnel and shelter approximately 50 meters under Ksiaz Castle that the Nazis were building for Hitler’s safety and that were part of a giant system of tens of kilometers of tunnels. in Walbrzych, Poland, on Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015, Polish authorities recently said that two unidentified men used radar to locate an armored train deep under the woodlands around Walbrzych, and believe it could be the so-called Nazi “gold train.” Rumors have swirled for decades about the train, also said to be filled with weapons, though there is absolutely no evidence that it ever existed. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)

    A view of a tunnel and shelter approximately 50 meters under Ksiaz Castle that the Nazis were building for Hitler’s safety and that were part of a giant system of tens of kilometers of tunnels. in Walbrzych, Poland, on Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015, Polish authorities recently said that two unidentified men used radar to locate an armored train deep under the woodlands around Walbrzych, and believe it could be the so-called Nazi “gold train.” Rumors have swirled for decades about the train, also said to be filled with weapons, though there is absolutely no evidence that it ever existed. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)  (The Associated Press)

  • An evacuation tunnel under Ksiaz Castle in Walbrzych, Poland on Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2015 that the Nazis built most probably for Adolf Hitler, leading to massive shelters that are part of a giant system of tunnels and bunkers around Walbrzych and believed by some explorers to hold a gold train that the Nazis allegedly hid in 1945 from the Red Army. Polish authorities recently said that two unidentified men used radar to locate an armored train deep under the woodlands around Walbrzych, and believe it could be the so-called Nazi “gold train.” Rumors have swirled for decades about the train, also said to be filled with weapons, though there is absolutely no evidence that it ever existed. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)

    An evacuation tunnel under Ksiaz Castle in Walbrzych, Poland on Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2015 that the Nazis built most probably for Adolf Hitler, leading to massive shelters that are part of a giant system of tunnels and bunkers around Walbrzych and believed by some explorers to hold a gold train that the Nazis allegedly hid in 1945 from the Red Army. Polish authorities recently said that two unidentified men used radar to locate an armored train deep under the woodlands around Walbrzych, and believe it could be the so-called Nazi “gold train.” Rumors have swirled for decades about the train, also said to be filled with weapons, though there is absolutely no evidence that it ever existed. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)  (The Associated Press)

Two men have appeared on Polish TV claiming they are the finders of a Nazi train said to be laden with gold.

Identifying themselves as Andreas Richter and Piotr Koper they appeared on TVP.INFO on Friday and said city authorities know the train's location in the area of Walbrzych, in southwestern Poland. Contacted by The Associated Press by phone, Andreas Richter confirmed he had found the train.

The pair said they had "irrefutable" proof of the train's existence, based on knowledge from witnesses and on their own research. They said it was an armored train from World War II.

TVP.INFO said it is not in a tunnel, as previously believed, but buried in the ground.

Local lore says the Nazis hid a train from the Red Army.