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The Latest on Koreas: Report says N. Koreas moving missiles; S. Korean military can't confirm

  • South Korean army soldiers stand guard at Unification Bridge near the border village of Panmunom in Paju, South Korea, Friday, Aug. 21, 2015. South Korea fired dozens of shells Thursday at rival North Korea after the North lobbed several rounds across the world's most heavily armed border and threatened to take further action unless Seoul ends its loudspeaker broadcasts. The North denied it fired any shots and warned of retaliation for what it called a serious provocation. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

    South Korean army soldiers stand guard at Unification Bridge near the border village of Panmunom in Paju, South Korea, Friday, Aug. 21, 2015. South Korea fired dozens of shells Thursday at rival North Korea after the North lobbed several rounds across the world's most heavily armed border and threatened to take further action unless Seoul ends its loudspeaker broadcasts. The North denied it fired any shots and warned of retaliation for what it called a serious provocation. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)  (The Associated Press)

  • A South Korean army soldier patrols at Unification Bridge near the border village of Panmunom in Paju, South Korea, Friday, Aug. 21, 2015. South Korea fired dozens of shells Thursday at rival North Korea after the North lobbed several rounds across the world's most heavily armed border and threatened to take further action unless Seoul ends its loudspeaker broadcasts. The North denied it fired any shots and warned of retaliation for what it called a serious provocation. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

    A South Korean army soldier patrols at Unification Bridge near the border village of Panmunom in Paju, South Korea, Friday, Aug. 21, 2015. South Korea fired dozens of shells Thursday at rival North Korea after the North lobbed several rounds across the world's most heavily armed border and threatened to take further action unless Seoul ends its loudspeaker broadcasts. The North denied it fired any shots and warned of retaliation for what it called a serious provocation. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)  (The Associated Press)

  • South Korean President Park Geun-hye, second from right, presides over a security meeting to check South Korea's military readiness against the North Korea's military attack at the headquarters of Third Army in Yongin, South Korea, Friday, Aug. 21, 2015. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on Friday declared his frontline troops in a "quasi-state of war" and ordered them to prepare for battle a day after the most serious confrontation between the rivals in years.  (Baek Seung-ryul/Yonhap via AP) KOREA OUT

    South Korean President Park Geun-hye, second from right, presides over a security meeting to check South Korea's military readiness against the North Korea's military attack at the headquarters of Third Army in Yongin, South Korea, Friday, Aug. 21, 2015. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on Friday declared his frontline troops in a "quasi-state of war" and ordered them to prepare for battle a day after the most serious confrontation between the rivals in years. (Baek Seung-ryul/Yonhap via AP) KOREA OUT  (The Associated Press)

The latest on the tensions on the Korean Peninsula (all times local):

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4 p.m.

South Korea's Yonhap news agency, citing an unidentified government source, is reporting that South Korean and U.S. surveillance assets detected the movement of vehicles in North Korea carrying short-range Scud and medium-range Rodong missiles in a possible preparation for launches.

South Korea's Defense Ministry said it could not confirm the report.

It comes after North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on Friday declared his front-line troops in a "quasi-state of war," a day after South Korea fired dozens of artillery rounds across the border.

It was in response to what Seoul said were North Korean artillery strikes meant to back up a threat to attack loudspeakers broadcasting anti-Pyongyang propaganda.