World

Fearless work: Myanmar journalist Aye Aye Win retires from Associated Press after 25 years

  • In this August 6, 2013, photo, Aye Aye Win, center, The Associated Press chief of bureau for Myanmar, is seated with unidentified guests as glasses are raised during a toast during a dinner in Yangon, Myanmar.  After 25 years with AP, Aye Aye Win, 61, is retiring after a career that followed the legacy left by her father, U Sein Win, AP’s Myanmar correspondent from 1969-1989, who was jailed three times while fighting for press freedom. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

    In this August 6, 2013, photo, Aye Aye Win, center, The Associated Press chief of bureau for Myanmar, is seated with unidentified guests as glasses are raised during a toast during a dinner in Yangon, Myanmar. After 25 years with AP, Aye Aye Win, 61, is retiring after a career that followed the legacy left by her father, U Sein Win, AP’s Myanmar correspondent from 1969-1989, who was jailed three times while fighting for press freedom. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this August 6, 2013, photo, Aye Aye Win, center, The Associated Press chief of bureau for Myanmar, is seated during a dinner in Yangon, Myanmar.  After 25 years with AP, Aye Aye Win, 61, is retiring after a career that followed the legacy left by her father, U Sein Win, AP’s Myanmar correspondent from 1969-1989, who was jailed three times while fighting for press freedom. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

    In this August 6, 2013, photo, Aye Aye Win, center, The Associated Press chief of bureau for Myanmar, is seated during a dinner in Yangon, Myanmar. After 25 years with AP, Aye Aye Win, 61, is retiring after a career that followed the legacy left by her father, U Sein Win, AP’s Myanmar correspondent from 1969-1989, who was jailed three times while fighting for press freedom. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this August 6, 2013, photo, Aye Aye Win, center, The Associated Press chief of bureau for Myanmar, stands to applause as she is acknowledged for her work at a dinner in Yangon, Myanmar.  After 25 years with AP, Aye Aye Win, 61, is retiring after a career that followed the legacy left by her father, U Sein Win, AP’s Myanmar correspondent from 1969-1989, who was jailed three times while fighting for press freedom. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

    In this August 6, 2013, photo, Aye Aye Win, center, The Associated Press chief of bureau for Myanmar, stands to applause as she is acknowledged for her work at a dinner in Yangon, Myanmar. After 25 years with AP, Aye Aye Win, 61, is retiring after a career that followed the legacy left by her father, U Sein Win, AP’s Myanmar correspondent from 1969-1989, who was jailed three times while fighting for press freedom. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)  (The Associated Press)

Aye Aye Win, The Associated Press chief of bureau in Myanmar who told her country's story to the world despite threats, surveillance and official warnings, is retiring after 25 years with the news agency.

Win carried on the legacy begun by her father, U Sein Win, AP's Myanmar correspondent from 1968-1989, who was jailed three times while fighting for press freedom. Together, their reporting spanned the decades when Myanmar was ruled by the military and its recent transition to civilian authority — changes that brought an end to its isolation but also saw the army retain great power.

For her perseverance, she won the International Women's Media Foundation's Courage in Journalism Award in 2008.

The IWMF described her as the "axe-handle of the foreign press" in Myanmar.