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The Latest: Germany welcomes new Greek finance minister as possibly smoothing talks

  • Two workers stand on a lifting platform during renovation works at the Euro sculpture in front of the old European Central Bank in Frankfurt, Germany, Monday, July 6, 2015. The sculpture will be renovated during the next four days. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)

    Two workers stand on a lifting platform during renovation works at the Euro sculpture in front of the old European Central Bank in Frankfurt, Germany, Monday, July 6, 2015. The sculpture will be renovated during the next four days. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)  (The Associated Press)

  • A butcher makes calculations inside his shop in central Athens, Tuesday, July 7, 2015. Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras heads Tuesday to Brussels, where he will try to use a bailout referendum victory to obtain a rescue deal with European leaders. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

    A butcher makes calculations inside his shop in central Athens, Tuesday, July 7, 2015. Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras heads Tuesday to Brussels, where he will try to use a bailout referendum victory to obtain a rescue deal with European leaders. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)  (The Associated Press)

  • A tourist takes a picture during her visit to the ancient Acropolis hill,  with the city of Athens in the background, on Tuesday, July 7, 2015. Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras was heading Tuesday to Brussels for an emergency meeting of eurozone leaders, where he will try to use a resounding referendum victory to eke out concessions from European creditors over a bailout for the crisis-ridden country. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

    A tourist takes a picture during her visit to the ancient Acropolis hill, with the city of Athens in the background, on Tuesday, July 7, 2015. Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras was heading Tuesday to Brussels for an emergency meeting of eurozone leaders, where he will try to use a resounding referendum victory to eke out concessions from European creditors over a bailout for the crisis-ridden country. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)  (The Associated Press)

The latest on the fallout from the Greek referendum (all times local):

8:40 a.m.

Germany's EU commissioner says he's optimistic that a new Greek finance minister and opposition parties' backing for Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras could smooth negotiations between Athens and its European creditors.

Tsipras' polarizing finance minister, Yanis Varoufakis, resigned Monday and was replaced by Euclid Tsakalotos. Three opposition parties offered backing for Tsipras in the bailout negotiations.

Commissioner Guenther Oettinger told Deutschlandfunk radio Tuesday that Tsakalotos "doesn't have the same attitude as his predecessor. He knows the figures, the facts, he knows our reform proposals ... and he knows that we are flexible."

German officials insist that, even after its voters rejected more austerity in a referendum, Greece must accept conditions for any new aid.

8:19 a.m.

French Prime Minister Manuel Valls says his country will do everything possible to keep Greece in the eurozone, saying its exit would be a "risk for global economic growth."

In an interview with the RTL radio network Tuesday, Valls denied that Grece's "no" vote was a rejection of Europe or its values but rather an expression of pride. He called on Greece's prime minister to put forward a plan and said France would be open to rescheduling Greece's debt.

Valls says: "The eurozone must stay coherent, reliable. Europe is not just a currency. It is a conception of the world."

Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras is headed Tuesday to Brussels to negotiate a rescue deal with European lenders.