World

UN official: Probe of alleged Iran nuke arms work within reach _ if Tehran cooperates

  • The International Atomic Energy Agency's director-general, Yukiya Amano, is seated during his meeting with Iran's President Hassan Rouhani in Tehran, Iran, Thursday, July 2, 2015. The head of the U.N. atomic agency, Amano, visited Tehran to discuss remaining outstanding issues over Iran's nuclear program. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency's director-general, Yukiya Amano, is seated during his meeting with Iran's President Hassan Rouhani in Tehran, Iran, Thursday, July 2, 2015. The head of the U.N. atomic agency, Amano, visited Tehran to discuss remaining outstanding issues over Iran's nuclear program. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)  (The Associated Press)

  • Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, centre, Head of the Iranian Atomic Energy Organization Ali Akbar Salehi, left, and Hossein Fereydoon, brother and close aide to President Hassan Rouhani, meet with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry in Vienna, Austria, Friday July 3, 2015.  Iran has committed to implementing the IAEA's "additional protocol" for inspections and monitoring as part of an accord, but the rules don't guarantee international monitors can enter any facility including sensitive military sites, so making it difficult to investigate allegations of secret work on nuclear weapons. (Carlos Barria/Pool via AP)

    Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, centre, Head of the Iranian Atomic Energy Organization Ali Akbar Salehi, left, and Hossein Fereydoon, brother and close aide to President Hassan Rouhani, meet with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry in Vienna, Austria, Friday July 3, 2015. Iran has committed to implementing the IAEA's "additional protocol" for inspections and monitoring as part of an accord, but the rules don't guarantee international monitors can enter any facility including sensitive military sites, so making it difficult to investigate allegations of secret work on nuclear weapons. (Carlos Barria/Pool via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, centre, meets with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif in Vienna, Austria, Friday July 3, 2015.  Iran has committed to implementing the IAEA's "additional protocol" for inspections and monitoring as part of an accord, but the rules don't guarantee international monitors can enter any facility including sensitive military sites, so making it difficult to investigate allegations of secret work on nuclear weapons. (Carlos Barria/Pool via AP)

    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, centre, meets with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif in Vienna, Austria, Friday July 3, 2015. Iran has committed to implementing the IAEA's "additional protocol" for inspections and monitoring as part of an accord, but the rules don't guarantee international monitors can enter any facility including sensitive military sites, so making it difficult to investigate allegations of secret work on nuclear weapons. (Carlos Barria/Pool via AP)  (The Associated Press)

The U.N. atomic agency chief says he can wrap up his probe of allegations that Iran worked secretly on nuclear arms by the end of the year but needs Tehran's cooperation to do so.

Yukiya Amano's comments Saturday were in line with his statement the day before on return from talks in Tehran. On Friday, he suggested that a meeting with Iranian President Hassan Rouhani has done little to advance his probe.

Amano, of the International Atomic Energy Agency , said Saturday that "more work will be needed" to kick-start the investigation — the same phrase he used Friday

The U.S. and its allies say the agency must deliver a ruling on the suspicions based on Iranian cooperation, as part of the overall nuclear deal now being negotiated.