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Poll finds Germans split on whether Greece should stay in eurozone

  • A Greek flag flies atop the parliament building as demonstrators from the Greek Communist party gather during a rally supporting the no vote for the upcoming referendum in Athens, Thursday, July 2, 2015. The battle for Greek votes entered full swing Thursday ahead of a crucial weekend referendum that could decide whether the country falls out of the euro. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

    A Greek flag flies atop the parliament building as demonstrators from the Greek Communist party gather during a rally supporting the no vote for the upcoming referendum in Athens, Thursday, July 2, 2015. The battle for Greek votes entered full swing Thursday ahead of a crucial weekend referendum that could decide whether the country falls out of the euro. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)  (The Associated Press)

  • Men, one of them using a magnifying glass, look at newspapers displayed at a news stand in central Athens, Friday, July 3, 2015. Rival campaigns in Greece’s bailout referendum end Friday, with rallies planned in Athens for “Yes” and “No” supporters - at the same time. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

    Men, one of them using a magnifying glass, look at newspapers displayed at a news stand in central Athens, Friday, July 3, 2015. Rival campaigns in Greece’s bailout referendum end Friday, with rallies planned in Athens for “Yes” and “No” supporters - at the same time. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)  (The Associated Press)

  • People wait to be allowed into the national bank of Greece to withdraw a maximum of 120 euros ($134) for the week, in central Athens, Friday, July 3, 2015. As Greek banks and markets remain closed Friday for a fifth day, rival campaigns scrambled to roll out their messages. And a prediction from the International Monetary Fund that Greece will need piles of additional cash from eurozone countries and others over the next three years put even more pressure on the government. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

    People wait to be allowed into the national bank of Greece to withdraw a maximum of 120 euros ($134) for the week, in central Athens, Friday, July 3, 2015. As Greek banks and markets remain closed Friday for a fifth day, rival campaigns scrambled to roll out their messages. And a prediction from the International Monetary Fund that Greece will need piles of additional cash from eurozone countries and others over the next three years put even more pressure on the government. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)  (The Associated Press)

The latest news on Greece's financial woes (all times local):

8:37 a.m.

Germans are divided on whether Greece should stay in the eurozone.

An opinion poll conducted for public broadcaster ARD found that 45 percent of Germans say Greece should keep the common currency. An equal number say Greece should leave the eurozone.

Sixty-nine percent of respondents say they are concerned about the impact that a possible bankruptcy of Greece might have on the country's population. Some 31 percent say they are worried about the cohesion of the European Union, while 24 percent are concerned about the consequences that such a possibility might have for the German economy.

The telephone poll of 1,001 adults, published Friday, was conducted from June 29-30. It had a margin of error of up to 3.1 percent.