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German co-pilot accused of crashing Airbus frequented glider field near crash site as a child

  • Spanish police officers pay tribute next to a stele and flowers laid in memory of the victims in the area where the Germanwings jetliner crashed in Le Vernet, France, Friday, March 27, 2015. Germanwings co-pilot Andreas Lubitz appears to have hidden evidence of an illness from his employers, including having been excused by a doctor from work on Tuesday, the day authorities say he crashed a passenger plane into a mountain, prosecutors said. (AP Photo/Claude Paris)

    Spanish police officers pay tribute next to a stele and flowers laid in memory of the victims in the area where the Germanwings jetliner crashed in Le Vernet, France, Friday, March 27, 2015. Germanwings co-pilot Andreas Lubitz appears to have hidden evidence of an illness from his employers, including having been excused by a doctor from work on Tuesday, the day authorities say he crashed a passenger plane into a mountain, prosecutors said. (AP Photo/Claude Paris)  (The Associated Press)

  • A stele and flowers laid in memory of the victims are placed in the area where the Germanwings jetliner crashed in the French Alps, in  Le Vernet, France, Friday, March 27, 2015. The crash of Germanwings Flight 9525 into an Alpine mountain, which killed all 150 people aboard, has raised questions about the mental state of the co-pilot. Authorities believe the 27-year-old German deliberately sought to destroy the Airbus A320 as it flew Tuesday from Barcelona to Duesseldorf. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

    A stele and flowers laid in memory of the victims are placed in the area where the Germanwings jetliner crashed in the French Alps, in Le Vernet, France, Friday, March 27, 2015. The crash of Germanwings Flight 9525 into an Alpine mountain, which killed all 150 people aboard, has raised questions about the mental state of the co-pilot. Authorities believe the 27-year-old German deliberately sought to destroy the Airbus A320 as it flew Tuesday from Barcelona to Duesseldorf. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)  (The Associated Press)

  • Students of the Joseph-Koenig Gymnasium  arrive for a memorial service  in Haltern, Germany, Friday, March 27, 2015. Sixteen  students  and two teachers from Haltern were among the 150 victims of a Germanwings  plane  that crashed  in the French Alps on Tuesday.  (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)

    Students of the Joseph-Koenig Gymnasium arrive for a memorial service in Haltern, Germany, Friday, March 27, 2015. Sixteen students and two teachers from Haltern were among the 150 victims of a Germanwings plane that crashed in the French Alps on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)  (The Associated Press)

A member of a gliding club in the French Alps says the German co-pilot accused of crashing a passenger plane nearby frequented the club as a child with his parents.

Francis Kefer, a member of the club in the town of Sisteron, said on i-Tele television that Andreas Lubitz' family and other members of the gliding club in his home town of Montabaur, Germany, came to the region regularly between 1996 and 2003.

French prosecutors say Lubitz deliberately slammed the Germanwings flight into a mountain on Tuesday. The crash site is about 60 kilometers (40 miles) away from the Sisteron glider airfield.

A special Mass is being held Saturday in the nearby town of Dignes-les-Bains to honor the victims.

German prosecutors are trying to determine why Lubitz crashed the plane.