World

Greek minister says government prepared for 'rupture' with creditors if talks don't go well

  • The 19th century statue of the ancient goddess Athena stands at the Athens Academy on Friday, March 27, 2015. Greek bank deposits dropped by more than 7.5 billion euros ($8.2 billion) in February, ramping up pressure on the country's teetering financial system as its government scrambles to reach a deal with creditors within days. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

    The 19th century statue of the ancient goddess Athena stands at the Athens Academy on Friday, March 27, 2015. Greek bank deposits dropped by more than 7.5 billion euros ($8.2 billion) in February, ramping up pressure on the country's teetering financial system as its government scrambles to reach a deal with creditors within days. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)  (The Associated Press)

  • People walk past the Bank of Greece headquarters, in central Athens, on Friday, March 27, 2015. Greek bank deposits dropped by more than 7.5 billion euros ($8.2 billion) in February, ramping up pressure on the country's teetering financial system as its government scrambles to reach a deal with creditors within days. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

    People walk past the Bank of Greece headquarters, in central Athens, on Friday, March 27, 2015. Greek bank deposits dropped by more than 7.5 billion euros ($8.2 billion) in February, ramping up pressure on the country's teetering financial system as its government scrambles to reach a deal with creditors within days. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)  (The Associated Press)

  • A man walks past  the Athens Academy with  the 19th century statue of the ancient goddess Athena, on Friday, March 27, 2015. Greek bank deposits dropped by more than 7.5 billion euros ($8.2 billion) in February, ramping up pressure on the country's teetering financial system as its government scrambles to reach a deal with creditors within days. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

    A man walks past the Athens Academy with the 19th century statue of the ancient goddess Athena, on Friday, March 27, 2015. Greek bank deposits dropped by more than 7.5 billion euros ($8.2 billion) in February, ramping up pressure on the country's teetering financial system as its government scrambles to reach a deal with creditors within days. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)  (The Associated Press)

Greece's alternate minister for international economic relations says his government is prepared for a "rupture" with the country's creditors if its current bailout negotiations don't go well.

Euclid Tsakalotos said Friday the government would not be negotiating properly if it didn't envisage a rupture with its partners, although he would not say what exactly a rupture might entail.

Greece's government is in talks with its creditors — eurozone nations, the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund — to unlock urgently needed funds from the country's bailout. It must present a list of reforms by early next week, which it hopes will lead to the disbursement.

Tsakalotos, speaking on private Star TV, said the government was intentionally creating ambiguity with its partners regarding its intentions as a negotiating tactic.