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Paris police break up Seine River stunt by Greenpeace ahead of key debate on nuclear power

  • Greenpeace activists dangle a banner from a bridge over the Seine river next to the National Assembly in Paris, Monday March 9, 2015. Police broke up a stunt by Greenpeace activists who dangled from the bridge and unfurled banners on the river that call for cuts in nuclear power. The banner shows an image of President Francois Hollande and his campaign-trail pledge to reduce France’s dependency on nuclear power from more than two-thirds of French energy production today. Hollande’s Socialist government has promised to reduce that to 50 percent by 2025. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)

    Greenpeace activists dangle a banner from a bridge over the Seine river next to the National Assembly in Paris, Monday March 9, 2015. Police broke up a stunt by Greenpeace activists who dangled from the bridge and unfurled banners on the river that call for cuts in nuclear power. The banner shows an image of President Francois Hollande and his campaign-trail pledge to reduce France’s dependency on nuclear power from more than two-thirds of French energy production today. Hollande’s Socialist government has promised to reduce that to 50 percent by 2025. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)  (The Associated Press)

  • Greenpeace activists unfold a banner on the Seine River next to the National Assembly in Paris, Monday, March 9, 2015. Police broke up a stunt by Greenpeace activists who dangled from a bridge and unfurled banners on the river that call for cuts in nuclear power. The banner shows an image of President Francois Hollande and his campaign-trail pledge to reduce France’s dependency on nuclear power from more than two-thirds of French energy production today. Hollande’s Socialist government has promised to reduce that to 50 percent by 2025. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)

    Greenpeace activists unfold a banner on the Seine River next to the National Assembly in Paris, Monday, March 9, 2015. Police broke up a stunt by Greenpeace activists who dangled from a bridge and unfurled banners on the river that call for cuts in nuclear power. The banner shows an image of President Francois Hollande and his campaign-trail pledge to reduce France’s dependency on nuclear power from more than two-thirds of French energy production today. Hollande’s Socialist government has promised to reduce that to 50 percent by 2025. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)  (The Associated Press)

  • Greenpeace activists unfold a banner on the Seine River, next to the National Assembly, in the background, in Paris, Monday, March 9, 2015. Police broke up a stunt by Greenpeace activists who dangled from a bridge and unfurled banners on the river that call for cuts in nuclear power. The banner shows an image of President Francois Hollande and his campaign-trail pledge to reduce France’s dependency on nuclear power from more than two-thirds of French energy production today. Hollande’s Socialist government has promised to reduce that to 50 percent by 2025. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)

    Greenpeace activists unfold a banner on the Seine River, next to the National Assembly, in the background, in Paris, Monday, March 9, 2015. Police broke up a stunt by Greenpeace activists who dangled from a bridge and unfurled banners on the river that call for cuts in nuclear power. The banner shows an image of President Francois Hollande and his campaign-trail pledge to reduce France’s dependency on nuclear power from more than two-thirds of French energy production today. Hollande’s Socialist government has promised to reduce that to 50 percent by 2025. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)  (The Associated Press)

Police in Paris have broken up a stunt by Greenpeace activists who dangled from a bridge and unfurled banners on the Seine River that call for cuts in nuclear power.

The activists are weighing in on a parliamentary debate this week about nuclear power in France. Greenpeace spokesman Sylvain Trottier said police detained five activists Monday.

The banners showed a picture of President Francois Hollande and his campaign-trail pledge to reduce France's dependency on nuclear power from more than two-thirds of French energy production today.

Hollande's Socialist government has promised to reduce that to 50 percent by 2025, but a Senate bill passed last week made no reference to that deadline. The National Assembly, parliament's lower house, has approved that timetable.