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Former Korean Air Lines executive says cabin crew erred in last day of nut rage trial

  • A bus carrying Cho Hyun-ah, former vice president of Korean Air Lines Co., arrives for her trial at the Seoul Western District Court in Seoul, South Korea, Monday, Feb. 2, 2015. Cho on trial after an inflight tantrum over a serving of nuts defended her actions as the result of devotion to work in the final day of testimony. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

    A bus carrying Cho Hyun-ah, former vice president of Korean Air Lines Co., arrives for her trial at the Seoul Western District Court in Seoul, South Korea, Monday, Feb. 2, 2015. Cho on trial after an inflight tantrum over a serving of nuts defended her actions as the result of devotion to work in the final day of testimony. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)  (The Associated Press)

  • A bus carrying Cho Hyun-ah, former vice president of Korean Air Lines Co., parks shortly after arriving at the Seoul Western District Court building garage in Seoul, South Korea, Monday, Feb. 2, 2015. Cho on trial after an inflight tantrum over a serving of nuts defended her actions as the result of devotion to work in the final day of testimony. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

    A bus carrying Cho Hyun-ah, former vice president of Korean Air Lines Co., parks shortly after arriving at the Seoul Western District Court building garage in Seoul, South Korea, Monday, Feb. 2, 2015. Cho on trial after an inflight tantrum over a serving of nuts defended her actions as the result of devotion to work in the final day of testimony. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)  (The Associated Press)

The former Korean Air executive on trial after an inflight tantrum over a serving of nuts defended her actions in the final day of testimony.

Cho Hyun-ah told a Seoul court Monday her behavior was "wrong" but she still believes cabin crew in first class did not follow proper procedures by offering macadamia nuts in a bag.

She ordered the chief flight attendant off the Dec. 5 flight after a confrontation with cabin crew, forcing the plane to return to the gate.

Cho, the daughter of Korean Air's chairman, has pleaded not guilty to charges of violating aviation safety law.

Cho said she did not realize the purser has law enforcement authority during the flight and that ordering him off the plane was consequently a risk to safety.