World

Commander in Joseph Kony's feared militia makes first International Criminal Court appearance

  • Dominic Ongwen, a Ugandan commander in warlord Joseph Kony's feared militia, waits for the judge to arrive as he made his first appearance at the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Netherlands, Monday, Jan. 26, 2015. Ongwen arrived in The Hague last week after being taken into custody in Central African Republic. He faces war crimes and crimes against humanity charges for his alleged role in a reign of terror that has spanned more than 25 years in central Africa's Great Lakes region. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool)

    Dominic Ongwen, a Ugandan commander in warlord Joseph Kony's feared militia, waits for the judge to arrive as he made his first appearance at the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Netherlands, Monday, Jan. 26, 2015. Ongwen arrived in The Hague last week after being taken into custody in Central African Republic. He faces war crimes and crimes against humanity charges for his alleged role in a reign of terror that has spanned more than 25 years in central Africa's Great Lakes region. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool)  (The Associated Press)

  • Dominic Ongwen, a Ugandan commander in warlord Joseph Kony's feared militia, waits for the judge to arrive as he made his first appearance at the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Netherlands, Monday, Jan. 26, 2015. Ongwen arrived in The Hague last week after being taken into custody in Central African Republic. He faces war crimes and crimes against humanity charges for his alleged role in a reign of terror that has spanned more than 25 years in central Africa's Great Lakes region. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool)

    Dominic Ongwen, a Ugandan commander in warlord Joseph Kony's feared militia, waits for the judge to arrive as he made his first appearance at the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Netherlands, Monday, Jan. 26, 2015. Ongwen arrived in The Hague last week after being taken into custody in Central African Republic. He faces war crimes and crimes against humanity charges for his alleged role in a reign of terror that has spanned more than 25 years in central Africa's Great Lakes region. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool)  (The Associated Press)

  • Dominic Ongwen, a Ugandan commander in warlord Joseph Kony's feared militia, waits for the judge to arrive as he made his first appearance at the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Netherlands, Monday, Jan. 26, 2015. Ongwen arrived in The Hague last week after being taken into custody in Central African Republic. He faces war crimes and crimes against humanity charges for his alleged role in a reign of terror that has spanned more than 25 years in central Africa's Great Lakes region. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool)

    Dominic Ongwen, a Ugandan commander in warlord Joseph Kony's feared militia, waits for the judge to arrive as he made his first appearance at the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Netherlands, Monday, Jan. 26, 2015. Ongwen arrived in The Hague last week after being taken into custody in Central African Republic. He faces war crimes and crimes against humanity charges for his alleged role in a reign of terror that has spanned more than 25 years in central Africa's Great Lakes region. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool)  (The Associated Press)

A commander in warlord Joseph Kony's feared militia is making his first appearance before an International Criminal Court judge.

Dominic Ongwen appeared in court Monday for a brief hearing to confirm his identity and that he understands the charges against him.

Ongwen arrived in The Hague last week after being taken into custody in Central African Republic. He faces war crimes and crimes against humanity charges for his alleged role in a reign of terror by Kony's Lord's Resistance Army that has spanned more than 25 years in central Africa's Great Lakes region.

Ongwen was one of five LRA commanders indicted by the ICC in 2005. Three other commanders have since died, according to the Ugandan army. Kony is the only one of the five to remain at large.