World

Surrendered LRA commander moved to Central African Republic, will be flown to The Hague soon

  • FILE - In this Sunday, April 29, 2012 file photo, a soldier from the Central African Republic looks out over the dense forest as he stands guard at a building used for joint meetings between them and U.S. Army special forces searching for Joseph Kony's Lord's Resistance Army (LRA), in Obo, Central African Republic. Dominic Ongwen, a commander of the notorious Ugandan rebel group the LRA, is expected to be flown to the Netherlands Saturday, Jan. 17, 2015 to face international war crimes charges after he surrendered in the town of Obo in a remote corner of the Central African Republic, authorities said. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)

    FILE - In this Sunday, April 29, 2012 file photo, a soldier from the Central African Republic looks out over the dense forest as he stands guard at a building used for joint meetings between them and U.S. Army special forces searching for Joseph Kony's Lord's Resistance Army (LRA), in Obo, Central African Republic. Dominic Ongwen, a commander of the notorious Ugandan rebel group the LRA, is expected to be flown to the Netherlands Saturday, Jan. 17, 2015 to face international war crimes charges after he surrendered in the town of Obo in a remote corner of the Central African Republic, authorities said. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Sunday, April 29, 2012 file photo, U.S. Army special forces Captain Gregory, 29, from Texas, right, who would only give his first name in accordance with special forces security guidelines, speaks with troops from the Central African Republic and Uganda who are searching for Joseph Kony's Lord's Resistance Army (LRA), in Obo, Central African Republic. Dominic Ongwen, a commander of the notorious Ugandan rebel group the LRA, is expected to be flown to the Netherlands Saturday, Jan. 17, 2015 to face international war crimes charges after he surrendered in the town of Obo in a remote corner of the Central African Republic, authorities said. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)

    FILE - In this Sunday, April 29, 2012 file photo, U.S. Army special forces Captain Gregory, 29, from Texas, right, who would only give his first name in accordance with special forces security guidelines, speaks with troops from the Central African Republic and Uganda who are searching for Joseph Kony's Lord's Resistance Army (LRA), in Obo, Central African Republic. Dominic Ongwen, a commander of the notorious Ugandan rebel group the LRA, is expected to be flown to the Netherlands Saturday, Jan. 17, 2015 to face international war crimes charges after he surrendered in the town of Obo in a remote corner of the Central African Republic, authorities said. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Sunday, April 29, 2012 file photo, the town of Obo, where U.S. special forces have paired up with local troops and Ugandan soldiers to seek out Joseph Kony's Lord's Resistance Army (LRA), is seen from the air in the Central African Republic. Dominic Ongwen, a commander of the notorious Ugandan rebel group the LRA, is expected to be flown to the Netherlands Saturday, Jan. 17, 2015 to face international war crimes charges after he surrendered in the town of Obo in a remote corner of the Central African Republic, authorities said. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)

    FILE - In this Sunday, April 29, 2012 file photo, the town of Obo, where U.S. special forces have paired up with local troops and Ugandan soldiers to seek out Joseph Kony's Lord's Resistance Army (LRA), is seen from the air in the Central African Republic. Dominic Ongwen, a commander of the notorious Ugandan rebel group the LRA, is expected to be flown to the Netherlands Saturday, Jan. 17, 2015 to face international war crimes charges after he surrendered in the town of Obo in a remote corner of the Central African Republic, authorities said. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)  (The Associated Press)

Authorities in Central African Republic say a Ugandan rebel commander who recently surrendered is now in the capital and awaiting extradition to face international war crimes charges.

Dominic Ongwen is expected to be transferred to the International Criminal Court later Saturday, according to Ghislain Grenzengue, Central African Republic's chief prosecutor.

Ongwen surrendered in a remote part of the country's east near Uganda. He was a longtime commander within the Lord's Resistance Army, a fearsome group blamed for slaughtering countless civilians and forcing others into slave labor.

The court's warrant of arrest for Ongwen lists seven counts of alleged individual criminal responsibility including crimes against humanity, enslavement, murder and inhumane acts of inflicting serious bodily injury.