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AFP photographer shot and wounded during protest against Charlie Hebdo in Karachi

  • Supporters of a Pakistani religious party Jamaat-i-Islami rally to protest against caricatures published in French magazine Charlie Hebdo, in Peshawar, Pakistan, Friday, Jan. 16, 2015. Pakistani students are clashing with police during protests against the French satirical magazine that was attacked last week for publishing images of the Prophet Muhammad. (AP Photo/Mohammad Sajjad)

    Supporters of a Pakistani religious party Jamaat-i-Islami rally to protest against caricatures published in French magazine Charlie Hebdo, in Peshawar, Pakistan, Friday, Jan. 16, 2015. Pakistani students are clashing with police during protests against the French satirical magazine that was attacked last week for publishing images of the Prophet Muhammad. (AP Photo/Mohammad Sajjad)  (The Associated Press)

  • Pakistani protesters chant slogans against caricatures published in French magazine Charlie Hebdo, in Peshawar, Pakistan, Friday, Jan. 16, 2015. Pakistani students are clashing with police during protests against the French satirical magazine that was attacked last week for publishing images of the Prophet Muhammad. (AP Photo/Mohammad Sajjad)

    Pakistani protesters chant slogans against caricatures published in French magazine Charlie Hebdo, in Peshawar, Pakistan, Friday, Jan. 16, 2015. Pakistani students are clashing with police during protests against the French satirical magazine that was attacked last week for publishing images of the Prophet Muhammad. (AP Photo/Mohammad Sajjad)  (The Associated Press)

  • A supporters of Pakistani religious group Jamaat-i-Islami tries to escape a water canon during a protest against caricatures published in the French magazine Charlie Hebdo, near the French Consulate in Karachi,  Pakistan, Friday, Jan. 16, 2015. Pakistani students are clashing with police during protests against the French satirical magazine that was attacked last week for publishing images of the Prophet Muhammad. (AP Photo/Shakil Adil)

    A supporters of Pakistani religious group Jamaat-i-Islami tries to escape a water canon during a protest against caricatures published in the French magazine Charlie Hebdo, near the French Consulate in Karachi, Pakistan, Friday, Jan. 16, 2015. Pakistani students are clashing with police during protests against the French satirical magazine that was attacked last week for publishing images of the Prophet Muhammad. (AP Photo/Shakil Adil)  (The Associated Press)

French news agency AFP says one of its photographers was shot in front of the French consulate in Karachi, Pakistan, during a demonstration against Charlie Hebdo.

Pakistani students clashed with police Friday afternoon during protests against the French satirical magazine that was attacked by gunmen last week for publishing images of the Prophet Muhammad.

The clashes broke out when the protesters started heading toward the consulate. They began throwing stones at the police, who tried to push them back with water cannons and tear gas.

AFP news director Michele Leridon said that Asif Hassan underwent surgery and that "his life does not seem in danger." AFP is now trying to find out whether Hassan was targeted or accidentally shot.

The protesters were mostly students affiliated with the Jamaat-e-Islami political party.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.

Pakistani students are clashing with police during protests against the French satirical magazine that was attacked last week for publishing images of the Prophet Muhammad.

The clashes broke out Friday afternoon when the protesters started heading toward the French consulate in the southern port city of Karachi. The protesters began throwing stones at the police, who tried to push them back with water cannons and tear gas.

The protesters were mostly students affiliated with the Jamaat-e-Islami political party.

Gunmen attacked the magazine, Charlie Hebdo, last week in an attack that left 12 people dead.

Pakistan has condemned the violence in France, but many people in this overwhelmingly Muslim country view the magazine's caricatures of Muhammed as a profound insult to Islam.