World

Defiant Charlie Hebdo with weeping Muhammad on cover: More turn out for us 'than for Mass'

  • FILE – In this Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015, file photo, Charlie Hebdo newspaper staff, with editorialist Patrick Pelloux, right, cartoonist Renald Luzier, known as Luz, left, grieve during a rally in Paris. Over a million people, including more than 40 world leaders, streamed into the heart of Paris for a rally of national unity, days after the attacks on the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, police officers and a kosher grocery. (AP Photo/Michel Euler, File)

    FILE – In this Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015, file photo, Charlie Hebdo newspaper staff, with editorialist Patrick Pelloux, right, cartoonist Renald Luzier, known as Luz, left, grieve during a rally in Paris. Over a million people, including more than 40 world leaders, streamed into the heart of Paris for a rally of national unity, days after the attacks on the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, police officers and a kosher grocery. (AP Photo/Michel Euler, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • Cartoonist Renald Luzier, known as Luz attends a press conference in Paris, France, Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2015.  Twelve people died when two masked gunmen assaulted the newspaper’s offices on Jan. 7, including much of the editorial staff and two police. It was the beginning of three days of terror around Paris that saw 17 people killed before the three Islamic extremist attackers were gunned down by security forces. Charlie Hebdo had faced repeated threats for depictions of the prophet, and its editor and his police bodyguard were the first to die. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

    Cartoonist Renald Luzier, known as Luz attends a press conference in Paris, France, Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2015. Twelve people died when two masked gunmen assaulted the newspaper’s offices on Jan. 7, including much of the editorial staff and two police. It was the beginning of three days of terror around Paris that saw 17 people killed before the three Islamic extremist attackers were gunned down by security forces. Charlie Hebdo had faced repeated threats for depictions of the prophet, and its editor and his police bodyguard were the first to die. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)  (The Associated Press)

  • The new chief editor of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, Gerard Biard, left, and columnist Patrick Pelloux, right, comfort cartoonist Luz during a press conference in Paris, France, Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2015. Twelve people died when two masked gunmen assaulted the newspaper’s offices on Jan. 7, including much of the editorial staff and two police. It was the beginning of three days of terror around Paris that saw 17 people killed before the three Islamic extremist attackers were gunned down by security forces. Charlie Hebdo had faced repeated threats for depictions of the prophet, and its editor and his police bodyguard were the first to die. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

    The new chief editor of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, Gerard Biard, left, and columnist Patrick Pelloux, right, comfort cartoonist Luz during a press conference in Paris, France, Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2015. Twelve people died when two masked gunmen assaulted the newspaper’s offices on Jan. 7, including much of the editorial staff and two police. It was the beginning of three days of terror around Paris that saw 17 people killed before the three Islamic extremist attackers were gunned down by security forces. Charlie Hebdo had faced repeated threats for depictions of the prophet, and its editor and his police bodyguard were the first to die. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)  (The Associated Press)

Charlie Hebdo's defiant issue is in print, with a caricature of the Prophet Muhammad on the cover and a double-page spread claiming that more turned out Sunday to back the satirical weekly "than for Mass."

Twelve people died when two masked gunmen assaulted the newspaper's offices on Jan. 7, including much of the editorial staff and two police. It was the beginning of three days of terror around Paris that saw 17 people killed before the three Islamic extremist attackers were gunned down by security forces.

Charlie Hebdo had faced repeated threats for depictions of the prophet, and its editor and his police bodyguard were the first to die.

The cover shows a weeping Muhammad, holding a sign saying "I am Charlie" with the words "All is forgiven" above him.