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Uganda says it wants to try Lord's Resistance Army rebel commander who surrendered

  • Joseph Kony's LRA has turned to ivory poaching to obtain money for building up their arsenal.

    Joseph Kony's LRA has turned to ivory poaching to obtain money for building up their arsenal.  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Sunday, April 29, 2012 file photo, the town of Obo, where U.S. special forces have paired up with local troops and Ugandan soldiers to seek out Joseph Kony's Lord's Resistance Army (LRA), is seen from the air in the Central African Republic. Uganda's government said Monday, Jan. 12, 2015, that it wants to try Lord's Resistance Army commander Dominic Ongwen, who recently surrendered to U.S. Forces and is in U.S. custody in Central African Republic, for war crimes and crimes against humanity, instead of at the International Criminal Court. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)

    FILE - In this Sunday, April 29, 2012 file photo, the town of Obo, where U.S. special forces have paired up with local troops and Ugandan soldiers to seek out Joseph Kony's Lord's Resistance Army (LRA), is seen from the air in the Central African Republic. Uganda's government said Monday, Jan. 12, 2015, that it wants to try Lord's Resistance Army commander Dominic Ongwen, who recently surrendered to U.S. Forces and is in U.S. custody in Central African Republic, for war crimes and crimes against humanity, instead of at the International Criminal Court. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Sunday, April 29, 2012 file photo, U.S. Army special forces Master Sergeant Eric, centre, who would only give his first name in accordance with special forces security guidelines, speaks with troops from the Central African Republic and Uganda, in Obo, Central African Republic, where U.S. special forces have paired up with local troops and Ugandan soldiers to seek out Joseph Kony's Lord's Resistance Army (LRA). Uganda's government said Monday, Jan. 12, 2015, that it wants to try Lord's Resistance Army commander Dominic Ongwen, who recently surrendered to U.S. Forces and is in U.S. custody in Central African Republic, for war crimes and crimes against humanity, instead of at the International Criminal Court. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)

    FILE - In this Sunday, April 29, 2012 file photo, U.S. Army special forces Master Sergeant Eric, centre, who would only give his first name in accordance with special forces security guidelines, speaks with troops from the Central African Republic and Uganda, in Obo, Central African Republic, where U.S. special forces have paired up with local troops and Ugandan soldiers to seek out Joseph Kony's Lord's Resistance Army (LRA). Uganda's government said Monday, Jan. 12, 2015, that it wants to try Lord's Resistance Army commander Dominic Ongwen, who recently surrendered to U.S. Forces and is in U.S. custody in Central African Republic, for war crimes and crimes against humanity, instead of at the International Criminal Court. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)  (The Associated Press)

Uganda's government says it wants the rebel commander who recently surrendered to be tried in the country for war crimes and crimes against humanity.

State Minister for Regional Cooperation Asuman Kiyingi said Monday that some leaders want Dominic Ongwen tried at the International Criminal Court, but that Uganda's court system has the capacity to try him. Ongwen, a Lord's Resistance Army commander wanted by the ICC, is in U.S. custody in Central African Republic after surrendering to American forces last week.

The LRA's rebellion began in Uganda.

Kiyingi said the decision would be made during consultations between the African Union, Uganda, U.S. and United Nations.

Ongwen, LRA leader Joseph Kony and three others who have reportedly since died were charged by the ICC.