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Catalan leaders weigh up results of unofficial independence from Spain poll amid skepticism

  • Pro independence supporters celebrate the results of an informal poll for the independence of Catalonia in Barcelona, Spain, Sunday, Nov. 9, 2014. Catalonia's government said more than a million voters participated Sunday in an informal vote on whether the wealthy northeastern region should secede from the rest of Spain. The regional Catalan government pushed forward with the vote despite Spain's Constitutional Court ordering its suspension on Tuesday after it agreed to hear the Spanish government's challenge that the poll is unconstitutional. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

    Pro independence supporters celebrate the results of an informal poll for the independence of Catalonia in Barcelona, Spain, Sunday, Nov. 9, 2014. Catalonia's government said more than a million voters participated Sunday in an informal vote on whether the wealthy northeastern region should secede from the rest of Spain. The regional Catalan government pushed forward with the vote despite Spain's Constitutional Court ordering its suspension on Tuesday after it agreed to hear the Spanish government's challenge that the poll is unconstitutional. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)  (The Associated Press)

  • Pro independence supporters celebrate the results of an informal poll for the independence of Catalonia in Barcelona, Spain, Sunday, Nov. 9, 2014.  Catalonia's government said more than a million voters participated Sunday in an informal vote on whether the wealthy northeastern region should secede from the rest of Spain. The regional Catalan government pushed forward with the vote despite Spain's Constitutional Court ordering its suspension on Tuesday after it agreed to hear the Spanish government's challenge that the poll is unconstitutional. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

    Pro independence supporters celebrate the results of an informal poll for the independence of Catalonia in Barcelona, Spain, Sunday, Nov. 9, 2014. Catalonia's government said more than a million voters participated Sunday in an informal vote on whether the wealthy northeastern region should secede from the rest of Spain. The regional Catalan government pushed forward with the vote despite Spain's Constitutional Court ordering its suspension on Tuesday after it agreed to hear the Spanish government's challenge that the poll is unconstitutional. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)  (The Associated Press)

  • Volunteer count ballot after an informal poll for the independence of Catalonia in Barcelona, Spain, Sunday, Nov. 9, 2014. The pro-independence regional government of Catalonia staged a symbolic poll on secession in a show of determination and defiance after the Constitutional Court suspended its plans to hold an official independence referendum following a legal challenge by the Spanish government.. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)

    Volunteer count ballot after an informal poll for the independence of Catalonia in Barcelona, Spain, Sunday, Nov. 9, 2014. The pro-independence regional government of Catalonia staged a symbolic poll on secession in a show of determination and defiance after the Constitutional Court suspended its plans to hold an official independence referendum following a legal challenge by the Spanish government.. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)  (The Associated Press)

The president of Catalonia is riding a wave of enthusiasm among independence seekers in his wealthy region a day after a non-binding vote on secession from Spain showed strong support for breaking away.

Artur Mas was given an ovation by jubilant government workers as he returned Monday to the wealthy region's headquarters to analyze the results of the unofficial referendum.

Sunday's poll sends a message that "Catalonia wants to decide its own future," said Francesc Homs, the regional government's spokesman.

With 97 percent of votes counted, the regional government said more than 2.2 million people had voted and of those, over 80 percent opted to break away.

Elsewhere, there was skepticism over the vote. "It is totally undemocratic," said church cleaner Carmen Santos in Madrid. "They haven't asked all Spaniards."