World

Few hopes of success seen in Hong Kong protesters' talks with officials

  • An umbrella, which has become an icon of the protest, reads pro-democracy messages above the student-led protest site in the Mong Kok district of Hong Kong, Monday, Oct. 20, 2014. Hong Kong Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying has claimed that "external forces" are participating in student-led pro-democracy protests that have occupied parts of this financial capital for more than three weeks, but provided no evidence to back his accusation.  (AP Photo/Wally Santana)

    An umbrella, which has become an icon of the protest, reads pro-democracy messages above the student-led protest site in the Mong Kok district of Hong Kong, Monday, Oct. 20, 2014. Hong Kong Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying has claimed that "external forces" are participating in student-led pro-democracy protests that have occupied parts of this financial capital for more than three weeks, but provided no evidence to back his accusation. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)  (The Associated Press)

  • Hong Kong government officials, from right,  the Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Bureau Undersecretary Lau Kong-wah, Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Secretary Raymond Tam,  Chief Secretary for Administration Carrie Lam, Justice Secretary Rimsky Yuen and Chief Executive's Office Director Edward Yau Tang-wah, sit opposite to the student leaders from the Hong Kong Federation of Students, from fifth left to far left,  General Secretary Eason Chung, Deputy Secretary-General Lester Shum, Secretary-General Alex Chow, Council Members Nathan Law and Yvonne Leung during a photo call before their talks in Hong Kong Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014. Hong Kong officials and student leaders hold talks Tuesday to try to end pro-democracy protests that have gripped the southern Chinese city for more than three weeks, though chances of success are slim given the vast differences between the two sides. The MC, center, is Lingnan University President Cheng Kwok Hon. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

    Hong Kong government officials, from right, the Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Bureau Undersecretary Lau Kong-wah, Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Secretary Raymond Tam, Chief Secretary for Administration Carrie Lam, Justice Secretary Rimsky Yuen and Chief Executive's Office Director Edward Yau Tang-wah, sit opposite to the student leaders from the Hong Kong Federation of Students, from fifth left to far left, General Secretary Eason Chung, Deputy Secretary-General Lester Shum, Secretary-General Alex Chow, Council Members Nathan Law and Yvonne Leung during a photo call before their talks in Hong Kong Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014. Hong Kong officials and student leaders hold talks Tuesday to try to end pro-democracy protests that have gripped the southern Chinese city for more than three weeks, though chances of success are slim given the vast differences between the two sides. The MC, center, is Lingnan University President Cheng Kwok Hon. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)  (The Associated Press)

  • Student leaders from the Hong Kong Federation of Students, from right to left,  General Secretary Eason Chung, Deputy Secretary-General Lester Shum, Secretary-General Alex Chow, Council Members Nathan Law and Yvonne Leung attend a photo call before their talks with the Hong Kong government officials in Hong Kong Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014. Hong Kong officials and student leaders hold talks Tuesday to try to end pro-democracy protests that have gripped the southern Chinese city for more than three weeks, though chances of success are slim given the vast differences between the two sides.(AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

    Student leaders from the Hong Kong Federation of Students, from right to left, General Secretary Eason Chung, Deputy Secretary-General Lester Shum, Secretary-General Alex Chow, Council Members Nathan Law and Yvonne Leung attend a photo call before their talks with the Hong Kong government officials in Hong Kong Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014. Hong Kong officials and student leaders hold talks Tuesday to try to end pro-democracy protests that have gripped the southern Chinese city for more than three weeks, though chances of success are slim given the vast differences between the two sides.(AP Photo/Kin Cheung)  (The Associated Press)

Hong Kong officials and student leaders will hold talks to try to end pro-democracy protests gripping the southern Chinese city for more than three weeks, though chances of success are slim given vast differences between the two sides.

The city's Beijing-backed leader won't be attending Tuesday evening's discussions.

Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying has reaffirmed his position that China's communist leaders won't allow Hong Kong citizens to openly nominate candidates for inaugural elections in 2017 to succeed him.

In comments to some foreign media, he said allowing full democracy in the Asian business hub would give the poor too much of a say.

Leung's comments underline how the protests have been fuelled by discontent among the young over soaring inequality in the former British colony.