World

Scientific team scours sunken Roman ship off Greek island for overlooked treasures

  • In this undated photo provided by Argo via the Greek Culture Ministry on Thursday, Oct. 9, 2014, a diver with a metal detector holds a copper ship's fitting next to a vase at the site of the Antikythera wreck off the island of Antikythera in southern Greece. The ministry said Thursday that a three-week underwater project to revisit the Roman-era wreck, first investigated more than a century ago, has completed detailed maps of the seabed and pinpointed potential metal artifacts. Divers have recovered a bronze spear that was probably part of a large statue, metal fittings from the ship and a vase. (AP Photo/ARGO via Greek Culture Ministry, Brett Seymour)

    In this undated photo provided by Argo via the Greek Culture Ministry on Thursday, Oct. 9, 2014, a diver with a metal detector holds a copper ship's fitting next to a vase at the site of the Antikythera wreck off the island of Antikythera in southern Greece. The ministry said Thursday that a three-week underwater project to revisit the Roman-era wreck, first investigated more than a century ago, has completed detailed maps of the seabed and pinpointed potential metal artifacts. Divers have recovered a bronze spear that was probably part of a large statue, metal fittings from the ship and a vase. (AP Photo/ARGO via Greek Culture Ministry, Brett Seymour)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this undated photo provided by Argo via Greek Culture Ministry on Thursday, Oct. 9, 2014, a diver holds a bronze spear at the site of the Antikythera wreck off the island of Antikythera in southern Greece. The ministry said Thursday that a three-week underwater project to revisit the Roman-era wreck, first investigated more than a century ago, has completed detailed maps of the seabed and pinpointed potential metal artifacts. Divers have recovered a bronze spear that was probably part of a large statue, metal fittings from the ship and a vase. (AP Photo/ARGO via Greek Culture Ministry, Brett Seymour)

    In this undated photo provided by Argo via Greek Culture Ministry on Thursday, Oct. 9, 2014, a diver holds a bronze spear at the site of the Antikythera wreck off the island of Antikythera in southern Greece. The ministry said Thursday that a three-week underwater project to revisit the Roman-era wreck, first investigated more than a century ago, has completed detailed maps of the seabed and pinpointed potential metal artifacts. Divers have recovered a bronze spear that was probably part of a large statue, metal fittings from the ship and a vase. (AP Photo/ARGO via Greek Culture Ministry, Brett Seymour)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this undated photo provided by Argo via the Greek Culture Ministry on Thursday, Oct. 9, 2014, a diver wearing a new metal suit that allows humans to reach great depths without decompressing, descends over the Antikythera wreck off the island of Antikythera in southern Greece. The ministry said Thursday that a three-week underwater project to revisit the Roman-era wreck, first investigated more than a century ago, has completed detailed maps of the seabed and pinpointed potential metal artifacts. Divers have recovered a bronze spear that was probably part of a large statue, metal fittings from the ship and a vase. (AP Photo/ARGO via Greek Culture Ministry, Brett Seymour)

    In this undated photo provided by Argo via the Greek Culture Ministry on Thursday, Oct. 9, 2014, a diver wearing a new metal suit that allows humans to reach great depths without decompressing, descends over the Antikythera wreck off the island of Antikythera in southern Greece. The ministry said Thursday that a three-week underwater project to revisit the Roman-era wreck, first investigated more than a century ago, has completed detailed maps of the seabed and pinpointed potential metal artifacts. Divers have recovered a bronze spear that was probably part of a large statue, metal fittings from the ship and a vase. (AP Photo/ARGO via Greek Culture Ministry, Brett Seymour)  (The Associated Press)

Archaeologists armed with top-notch technology have scoured one of the richest shipwrecks of antiquity for overlooked treasures, recovering a scattering of artefacts amid indications that significant artworks may await discovery under the seabed.

The Roman wreck off Antikythera Island, southern Greece, was located more than a century ago, when divers in primitive suits raised marble and bronze statues, luxury tableware and a complex clockwork computer.

Over the past three weeks, a U.S.-Greek team comprehensively mapped the seabed, and divers raised a bronze spear that probably belonged to a larger than life-sized statue, and metal fittings from the 1st century B.C. wooden ship.

A Greek Culture Ministry statement Thursday said divers with metal detectors also located "strong signals," which could point to ancient artefacts that evaded the first investigation in 1901.