World

Libya's prime minister visits the UAE to shore up support for fight against Islamist militias

  • FILE - In this Sept. 14, 2012 file photo, Libyan military guards check one of the U.S. consulate's burned buildings in Benghazi, after a deadly attack on Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2012, that killed four Americans. In September, 2014, as Libya crumbles into a failed state, a unique geography is emerging. The recently elected parliament is relegated to a remote eastern city in a sort of internal exile, along with the forces that support it. In the capital, Islamist-allied militias have set up their own government after capturing not only Tripoli but also Libya’s second-largest city, Benghazi. All around the country, cities, towns and tribes are now choosing sides, raising fears of outright civil war. (AP Photo/Mohammad Hannon, File)

    FILE - In this Sept. 14, 2012 file photo, Libyan military guards check one of the U.S. consulate's burned buildings in Benghazi, after a deadly attack on Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2012, that killed four Americans. In September, 2014, as Libya crumbles into a failed state, a unique geography is emerging. The recently elected parliament is relegated to a remote eastern city in a sort of internal exile, along with the forces that support it. In the capital, Islamist-allied militias have set up their own government after capturing not only Tripoli but also Libya’s second-largest city, Benghazi. All around the country, cities, towns and tribes are now choosing sides, raising fears of outright civil war. (AP Photo/Mohammad Hannon, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this July 28, 2014 file photo, black smoke billows over the skyline as a fire at the oil depot for the airport rages out of control after being struck in the crossfire of warring militias battling for control of the airfield, in Tripoli, Libya. In September, 2014, as Libya crumbles into a failed state, a unique geography is emerging. The recently elected parliament is relegated to a remote eastern city in a sort of internal exile, along with the forces that support it. In the capital, Islamist-allied militias have set up their own government after capturing not only Tripoli but also Libya’s second-largest city, Benghazi. All around the country, cities, towns and tribes are now choosing sides, raising fears of outright civil war. (AP Photo/Mohammed Ben Khalifa, File)

    FILE - In this July 28, 2014 file photo, black smoke billows over the skyline as a fire at the oil depot for the airport rages out of control after being struck in the crossfire of warring militias battling for control of the airfield, in Tripoli, Libya. In September, 2014, as Libya crumbles into a failed state, a unique geography is emerging. The recently elected parliament is relegated to a remote eastern city in a sort of internal exile, along with the forces that support it. In the capital, Islamist-allied militias have set up their own government after capturing not only Tripoli but also Libya’s second-largest city, Benghazi. All around the country, cities, towns and tribes are now choosing sides, raising fears of outright civil war. (AP Photo/Mohammed Ben Khalifa, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - Sunday Aug. 31, 2014 file photo taken during a tour offered to onlookers and journalists by the Dawn of Libya militia, damage is seen in the front yard of a building at the U.S. Embassy compound in Tripoli, Libya, after weeks of violence between rival militias over control of the capital. In September, 2014, as Libya crumbles into a failed state, a unique geography is emerging. The recently elected parliament is relegated to a remote eastern city in a sort of internal exile, along with the forces that support it. In the capital, Islamist-allied militias have set up their own government after capturing not only Tripoli but also Libya’s second-largest city, Benghazi. All around the country, cities, towns and tribes are now choosing sides, raising fears of outright civil war. (AP Photo, File)

    FILE - Sunday Aug. 31, 2014 file photo taken during a tour offered to onlookers and journalists by the Dawn of Libya militia, damage is seen in the front yard of a building at the U.S. Embassy compound in Tripoli, Libya, after weeks of violence between rival militias over control of the capital. In September, 2014, as Libya crumbles into a failed state, a unique geography is emerging. The recently elected parliament is relegated to a remote eastern city in a sort of internal exile, along with the forces that support it. In the capital, Islamist-allied militias have set up their own government after capturing not only Tripoli but also Libya’s second-largest city, Benghazi. All around the country, cities, towns and tribes are now choosing sides, raising fears of outright civil war. (AP Photo, File)  (The Associated Press)

The Libyan prime minister has met with leaders of the United Arab Emirates to shore up support for his efforts to form a government after the elected parliament that chose him was forced to flee the capital by Islamist-allied militias over the summer.

The UAE state news agency said that Abdullah al-Thinni was in the country Wednesday to discuss the importance of strengthening bilateral relations in a way that serves the joint interests of both countries. The UAE has cracked down hard on Islamist groups domestically and backed regional efforts to crush the Muslim Brotherhood.

U.S. officials had suggested that the UAE and Egypt were behind air strikes on Islamist militias in Libya, but al-Thinni told reporters in Abu Dhabi that there was no evidence to support that claim.