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6.3 Magnitude Earthquake In Veracruz Hits Mexico's Gulf Coast

FILE - This Aug. 23, 2011 file photo shows office workers gathering on the sidewalk in downtown Washington after a 5.9 magnitude tremor shook the nation's capitol. The earthquake centered northwest of Richmond, Va., shook much of Washington, D.C., and was felt as far north as Rhode Island and New York City. A new federal earthquake risk map dials up the shaking hazard just a bit for about half of the United States and lowers it for nearly a quarter of the nation. The U.S. Geologic Survey updated Thursday its national seismic hazard maps for the first time since 2008, taking into account research from the devastating 2011 earthquake and tsunami off the Japanese coast and the surprise 2011 Virginia temblor. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

FILE - This Aug. 23, 2011 file photo shows office workers gathering on the sidewalk in downtown Washington after a 5.9 magnitude tremor shook the nation's capitol. The earthquake centered northwest of Richmond, Va., shook much of Washington, D.C., and was felt as far north as Rhode Island and New York City. A new federal earthquake risk map dials up the shaking hazard just a bit for about half of the United States and lowers it for nearly a quarter of the nation. The U.S. Geologic Survey updated Thursday its national seismic hazard maps for the first time since 2008, taking into account research from the devastating 2011 earthquake and tsunami off the Japanese coast and the surprise 2011 Virginia temblor. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)  (AP)

A strong earthquake shook much of eastern Mexico on Tuesday, but there were no reports of damage or injury.

The U.S. Geological Survey said the magnitude-6.3 quake was centered in the Gulf coast state of Veracruz, about 260 miles (418 kilometers) east-southeast of Mexico City. The epicenter was 59 miles (95 kilometers) below the surface.

"These types of earthquakes are short and very fast," National Civil Protection Coordinator Luis Felipe Puente told the Televisa network, adding that the quake was deep. "Thanks to that, it basically didn't affect any construction."

The 5:46 a.m. (6:46 a.m. EDT; 1046 GMT) quake was felt strongly in the Gulf port city of Veracruz, where frightened people ran into the streets, and hotels in the tourist zone were evacuated. It rocked buildings at least as far away as Mexico City.

The state of Veracruz is home to a major nuclear power plant, Laguna Verde, and some of Mexico's key petroleum facilities. State civil protection officials said preliminary checks found no damage to any of those installations.

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