World

French far-right chief: No public funds for religious groups when her party wins vote

  • National Front leader Marine le Pen  folds her arms during an interview with the Associated Press at the party headquarters in Nanterre outside Paris, Monday, March 3, 2014. The leader of France’s far-right National Front is looking to apply some basic principles of her anti-immigrant party in towns where it is victorious in municipal elections this month, like refusing precious public funds for religious associations. A leading euro-skeptic, Le Pen is also looking to boost her party’s strength in European Parliament elections in May. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

    National Front leader Marine le Pen folds her arms during an interview with the Associated Press at the party headquarters in Nanterre outside Paris, Monday, March 3, 2014. The leader of France’s far-right National Front is looking to apply some basic principles of her anti-immigrant party in towns where it is victorious in municipal elections this month, like refusing precious public funds for religious associations. A leading euro-skeptic, Le Pen is also looking to boost her party’s strength in European Parliament elections in May. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)  (The Associated Press)

  • National Front leader Marine Le Pen laughs during an interview with the Associated Press at the party headquarters in Nanterre outside Paris, Monday, March 3, 2014. The leader of France’s far-right National Front is looking to apply some basic principles of her anti-immigrant party in towns where it is victorious in municipal elections this month, like refusing precious public funds for religious associations. A leading euro-skeptic, Le Pen is also looking to boost her party’s strength in European Parliament elections in May.  (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

    National Front leader Marine Le Pen laughs during an interview with the Associated Press at the party headquarters in Nanterre outside Paris, Monday, March 3, 2014. The leader of France’s far-right National Front is looking to apply some basic principles of her anti-immigrant party in towns where it is victorious in municipal elections this month, like refusing precious public funds for religious associations. A leading euro-skeptic, Le Pen is also looking to boost her party’s strength in European Parliament elections in May. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)  (The Associated Press)

  • National Front leader Marine le Pen answers during an interview with the Associated Press at the party headquarters in Nanterre outside Paris, Monday, March 3, 2014. The leader of France’s far-right National Front is looking to apply some basic principles of her anti-immigrant party in towns where it is victorious in municipal elections this month, like refusing precious public funds for religious associations. A leading euro-skeptic, Le Pen is also looking to boost her party’s strength in European Parliament elections in May.  (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

    National Front leader Marine le Pen answers during an interview with the Associated Press at the party headquarters in Nanterre outside Paris, Monday, March 3, 2014. The leader of France’s far-right National Front is looking to apply some basic principles of her anti-immigrant party in towns where it is victorious in municipal elections this month, like refusing precious public funds for religious associations. A leading euro-skeptic, Le Pen is also looking to boost her party’s strength in European Parliament elections in May. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)  (The Associated Press)

The leader of France's far-right National Front says her party will cut public funds to religious groups in towns where it wins municipal elections this month.

Marine Le Pen's party is on a roll, riding a wave of anti-immigration and anti-Muslim voter sentiment around Europe.

Le Pen told The Associated Press in an interview Monday that secularism will be strictly applied in towns the National Front wins in voting March 23 and 30, and referendums will be held on major issues.

Le Pen praised the recent Swiss decision, in a referendum, to cap immigration, saying countries have an "inalienable right" to control their borders.

A leading euro-skeptic, Le Pen is also looking to boost her party's strength in European Parliament elections in May.