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New Hampshire Considering In-State Tuition For Students In U.S. Illegally

WASHINGTON - APRIL 20:  Students throw their caps during a mock graduation ceremony at the West Front of the U.S. Capitol April 20, 2004 in Washington, DC. Several hundred students and advocates took part in the ceremony and urged Congress and the Bush administration to pass the Dream Act, which would put U.S.-raised immigrant students on the path to college and U.S. citizenship.  (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON - APRIL 20: Students throw their caps during a mock graduation ceremony at the West Front of the U.S. Capitol April 20, 2004 in Washington, DC. Several hundred students and advocates took part in the ceremony and urged Congress and the Bush administration to pass the Dream Act, which would put U.S.-raised immigrant students on the path to college and U.S. citizenship. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)  (2004 Getty Images)

The New Hampshire House of Representatives is considering giving students in the state university system who entered the U.S. illegally in-state tuition if they met certain requirements.

The House is scheduled to vote on legislation Wednesday that would require students to be a graduate of a high school in the state or to have gotten a New Hampshire high school equivalency certificate to be eligible for the in-state rate.

They would have to have attended a state high school for three years before graduating or receiving an equivalency certificate and have to meet all the other criteria to qualify for in-state rates.

Students also would be required to apply for legal residency.

Opponents argue it isn't fair for out-of-state students to pay higher tuition than students who are in the country illegally.

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