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Russian crash investigators find recordings of crew conversations from crashes Boeing

  • In this photo provided by Russian Emergency Situations Ministry, firefighters and rescuers work at the crash site of a Russian passenger airliner near Kazan, the capital of the Tatarstan republic, about 720 kilometers (450 miles) east of Moscow, on Sunday, Nov. 17, 2013. The Russian passenger airliner crashed Sunday night while trying to land at the airport in the city of Kazan, killing all 50 people onboard, officials said. The Boeing 737 belonging to Tatarstan Airlines crashed an hour after taking off from Moscow. There were no immediate indications of the cause. (AP Photo/Russian Emergency Situations Ministry)

    In this photo provided by Russian Emergency Situations Ministry, firefighters and rescuers work at the crash site of a Russian passenger airliner near Kazan, the capital of the Tatarstan republic, about 720 kilometers (450 miles) east of Moscow, on Sunday, Nov. 17, 2013. The Russian passenger airliner crashed Sunday night while trying to land at the airport in the city of Kazan, killing all 50 people onboard, officials said. The Boeing 737 belonging to Tatarstan Airlines crashed an hour after taking off from Moscow. There were no immediate indications of the cause. (AP Photo/Russian Emergency Situations Ministry)  (The Associated Press)

  • People place flowers in Kazan airport Monday, Nov. 18, 2013. A plane belonging to Tatarstan Airlines crashed Sunday while trying to land at its home port in the Russian city of Kazan, the capital of the oil-rich province of Tatarstan. The son of the provincial governor and the chief of the local branch of Russia's main security agency were among the victims. (AP Photo/ Nikolai Alexandrov)

    People place flowers in Kazan airport Monday, Nov. 18, 2013. A plane belonging to Tatarstan Airlines crashed Sunday while trying to land at its home port in the Russian city of Kazan, the capital of the oil-rich province of Tatarstan. The son of the provincial governor and the chief of the local branch of Russia's main security agency were among the victims. (AP Photo/ Nikolai Alexandrov)  (The Associated Press)

Russian crash investigators say they have found a tape of cockpit conversations from a Boeing 737 that slammed into the ground in a nosedive crash, killing all 50 people on board.

The voice-recording tape, missing when its container was found earlier, was located by search teams Wednesday.

Systems data retrieved from another onboard black box allowed the Moscow-based Interstate Aviation Committee to conclude that the crew lost speed in a steep climb, then overcompensated and sent the plane into a near-vertical dive. It said all the plane's systems were working normally until the moment it hit the ground and exploded in a giant fireball.

The Tatarstan Airlines plane was flying from Moscow to the central city of Kazan, 720 kilometers (450 miles) to the east.