Asia

China bans Tiananmen Square Internet searches in hopes to ease tensions

June 4, 2013: Protesters participate in a candlelight vigil at Hong Kong's Victoria Park to mourn those who died in a military crackdown on pro-democracy movement at Beijing's Tiananmen Square in 1989. Tuesday marks the 24th anniversary of the military crackdown of the movement

June 4, 2013: Protesters participate in a candlelight vigil at Hong Kong's Victoria Park to mourn those who died in a military crackdown on pro-democracy movement at Beijing's Tiananmen Square in 1989. Tuesday marks the 24th anniversary of the military crackdown of the movement  (Reuters)

Today. Tomorrow. Big Yellow Duck.

All are search terms now banned in China.

In an attempt to soften tensions on the 24th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre Tuesday, Chinese Communist Party officials are banning a list of search terms of Sina Weibo, one of the country’s most popular social media sites, the Guardian reports.

Among searches like “special day” and “that year,” numerical combinations that could refer to June 4, 1989, are also off-limits.

Internet users have been posting references to commemorate the tragedy in pictures in hopes to circumvent censors, the Guardian reports.

The Chinese government views the Tiananmen protest – in which troops fired at unarmed demonstrators – as a rebellion, and uses the crackdown as a means to control social stability.

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