Missouri pilots to drop 'pumpkin bombs' from planes ahead of Halloween

If you think pumpkins are only good for carving or flavoring lattes, think again.

On Oct. 28, pumpkin and plane enthusiasts alike will unite at St. Charles County Smartt Airport near St. Louis for the ninth annual Pumpkin Drop, during which pilots fly out of the public airport to “pumpkin bomb” for both show and sport.

Run by the St. Charles Flying Service, president Dennis Bampton told Fox News that the flight school’s signature event is fun for the entire family, and boasts a full schedule of events.

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Festivities commence with a 10 a.m. competition, with pilots flying their own or rented aircraft to drop pumpkins onto a target in hopes of winning prize money, Bampton said.

St. Charles Flying Service

Loading up a plane before show time.  (St. Charles Flying Service)

Later that day, at 1:30 p.m., a restored World War II B25 Bomber and Torpedo Bomber from the Commemorative Air Force are loaded up with pumpkins for a grand display. Soaring high in the sky for “bomb runs,” the pilots then releases the gourds, attempting to smash them on an old trainer airplane used as an additional target.

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Spectators can get up close and personal with the exhibition from a safely sectioned off area. Even better, in case any folks are overcome with sudden (understandable) desire to go pumpkin-bomb themselves, flight instructors will be available at the hangar to answer any questions relative to becoming a pilot, added Bampton.

st charles flying school

St. Charles Flying Service  (Some Pumpkin Drop attendees. )

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A restored plane releasing pumpkins from the high skies.  (St. Charles Flying Service)

So don't assume every use for the pumpkin had been exhausted — autumn’s omnipresent gourd has snuck up and surprised us again. And from the sky, this time.