OTR Interviews

Hillary, Warren ... how about Carly Fiorina in 2016?

Could the former Hewlett-Packard CEO bring a woman's touch - and business leader sensibility - to the race for the White House?

 

This is a rush transcript from "On the Record," January 13, 2015. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

GRETA VAN SUSTEREN, FOX NEWS HOST: Are we about to see a prominent businesswoman, a former CEO throw her hat into the G.O.P. presidential ring? Well, there are new signs that former Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly Fiorina may soon announce a 2016 run.

And Carly Fiorina joins uS. So naturally, I am going to try to -- first of all, welcome Carly. I will try to get the answer out of you. Are you going to run?

CARLY FIORINA, FORMER HEWLETT-PACKARD CEO: Well, I'm giving it very serious consideration. I think I bring different experience to the table, different perspective, and a different voice.

VAN SUSTEREN: Why do you want to be president? To me, it's like the last job I would want.

FIORINA: Well, look, I think that much of the experience that I have equips me to make complex decisions. I have been in and around the world for a very long time, know most of the world leaders that are now being talked about. But mostly I want to be president because I think if I choose to do this, and I haven't made that decision, because I think we are crushing the potential of this nation. And this should be the American century. But so much of what policies and politicians are doing is making it too hard for Americans to fulfill their potential. And as we saw from this tragic attack in Paris, it's not just that we are crushing the potential of Americans but the world is a sadder and more dangerous place without American leadership. And America is not leading today in the world.

VAN SUSTEREN: You bring up Paris. Let me bring up the topic that sort of captivated a lot of us, should the president have gone or not?

FIORINA: Well, at the very least, he should have sent someone very close to him, Michelle, the vice president, the secretary of state. But honestly, it's just inconceivable to me that the president wasn't even aware, apparently, that this event was being planned, so that he would have a conversation with his staff about whether or not he should go or someone else should go.

VAN SUSTEREN: So is that staff failing?

(CROSSTALK)

FIORINA: If you turned on the television, you knew this was going to happen.

VAN SUSTEREN: You don't buy it that the staff never told him?

FIORINA: I find it inconceivable that the president wasn't aware that this was going to happen and that he had a decision to make. On the other hand, we have heard over and over again this president say that he found out by reading the paper. He found out by watching television. So I don't know. I just find his apparent ignorance of what's going on around him quite stunning. And obviously, he is failing as a chief executive.

VAN SUSTEREN: All right. Let me go back to the presidential question. Have you been to Iowa or New Hampshire in the last six months?

FIORINA: Well, I have because I formed a super PAC effort to tap the potential of women in a grass roots effort called Unlocking Potential. We have worked very hard to help elect Joni Ernst and Cory Gardner. We worked hard to elect Scott Brown, we failed there. But yes, I have been to Iowa and New Hampshire a lot.

VAN SUSTEREN: Well, that's always sort of a tip, who is making calls and dropping in on New Hampshire.

FIORINA: I also went to Texas and Illinois and Florida and Kansas. I have been in a lot of places helping candidates.

VAN SUSTEREN: All right. If you do announce, I sure hope you don't forget us here On The Record.

FIORINA: I will never forget you, Greta.

VAN SUSTEREN: We always go pounding after all the candidates. So I hope you come back.

FIORINA: I certainly will.

VAN SUSTEREN: Thank you, Carly.

FIORINA: Thanks for having me.