THE FIVE

Tinseltown out of touch?

Stars pushing Robin Hood tax

 

This is a rush transcript from "The Five," June 22, 2012. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

GREG GUTFELD, CO-HOST: So the "Hollywood Reporter" says Barack Obama celebrity fundraisers are drawing a backlash from Hollywood. As this man of the people is now Anna Wintour's lapdog, I just hope Obama doesn't start raffling back rubs for a heck. He'll have a new supporter.

But can you blame the Obama fans for a concern? Consider the average idiot celebrity. Their new cause now, the Robin Hood tax, which calls for 50 cents tax for every 100 bucks traded on Wall Street. It stars Coldplay's Chris Martin, musician Tom Morello and movie actor Mark Ruffalo.

This tax would fund their pet causes like climate change, of course. Their strategy, defacing currency.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The best way is to simplify this is the dollar bill, where we had George Washington, symbol of this country. What we want to do is put a hat on George Washington symbolizing Robin Hood. We'd put a mask on him because our government is robbing our people in this particular point.

TOM MORELLO: I am Tom Morello, I support the Robin Hood tax. George Washington is about to become an occupier.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GUTFELD: He's British.

So what's odd about this? These people are old. Morello is like 50. Ruffalo is 44. They're infants, babies looking for a fairy tale for economic theory.

And while the tax would harm pension and 401(k)s, stars are just too rich to feel the pinch.

So, let's do the same to them -- an art tax. For every grand a film cost to make, tax it 100 bucks and give it to the military. They'll love that.

But I don't even know what to say anymore about Hollywood. So, why not start another one, a new one. Set ground rules this time.

First no, self-important political statement. No awareness raising. No loud fundraisers about issues you can't possibly understand while you Google yourself all cooked up.

So, I propose a new Tinseltown, some place sensible like the Midwest.

After all, does I it take special skills to make -- to direct a video Rob Schneider film?

The country deserves better than these losers, well, unless the country is North Korea.

ERIC BOLLING, CO-HOST: You don't like Rob Schneider?

GUTFELD: What has Rob Schneider done for you?

KIMBERLY GUILFOYLE, CO-HOST: Why are you mad at the North Koreans?

GUTFELD: I know. Good point.

GUILFOYLE: I mean, really. They have suffered terribly. They don't even have electricity.

GUTFELD: Juan, is Obama's Hollywood connection hurting him?

JUAN WILLIAMS, CO-HOST: No. I was thinking that Anna Wintour was hurting him. That's a New York connection right.

GUTFELD: True.

WILLIAMS: He had a fundraiser here in New York and it looked like, you know --

GUTFELD: Yes, sex in the city is what they call it.

WILLIAMS: OK. So, that -- I didn't think that came over too well.

But no, I think it's a big boon, because in fact Wall Street, you know, they don't like him these days. So, I mean, if he wasn't getting money from Hollywood, he'd be in big trouble.

GUTFELD: He's got to get it somewhere, K.G.

GUILFOYLE: Well, he's losing his mojo and his moula. It's very obvious to me.

You know who is making the money?

GUTFELD: Who?

GUILFOYLE: Romney. He is on record it looks like for $100 million for the month of June by the time reporting closes.

GUTFELD: But very little from celebrities.

GUILFOYLE: Count those.

DANA PERINO, CO-HOST: But Hollywood as a whole, they are fair weather friends. Listen to this profile in courage from the article from one Hollywood fundraising insider who would not give his name.

We don't like what he is doing but we understand it. He has to raise money. It's a bad situation.

So, now, all of a sudden, they're upset. Maybe they are upset the campaign is running through money so fast. But the thing that drives me crazy about these actors is that in the Robin Hood story, they steal from the government to give to the poor.

GUTFELD: Right.

PERINO: So, why, I don't understand --

(CROSSTALK)

GUTFELD: They are stealing from the rich to give to the government, which then spends --

GUILFOYLE: Solyndra.

PERINO: It will be much more direct to just take it out of their bank account.

BOLLING: But you know the interesting part is they will still pony up

38,500 bucks to go shake the guy's hand.

PERINO: But they have so much money, so they don't care if the tax rate goes up, because they have accountants and offshore accounts and that other stuff so that it doesn't affect them. If you run a small business and a tool company, and you have 55 employees, and you are trying to figure out a way to make payroll every month, you can't necessarily just write a check for $38,000.

WILLIAMS: Offshore accounts, big money.

PERINO: Absolutely.

WILLIAMS: They should be in the Romney campaign. Why didn't I think of this? I should have thought of this.

GUTFELD: Absolutely you are right.

WILLIAMS: They should be in the Romney camp. Oh, my gosh.

GUILFOYLE: Give Juan the prop again, the redacted papers.

(LAUGHTER)

PERINO: You know what they'll do with Romney? In about two years, there will be a movie about Romney. It won't be Romney. It will be some out of touch, rich, weird Mormon guy and they'll do a movie about it and that's what they'll make all their money so that in four years, they can give more money to another Democratic candidate.

BOLLING: Wait, wait. Wouldn't it be President Romney in two years?

PERINO: Yes.

GUTFELD: Drawing on money is just silly and stupid. These are grown --

PERINO: And illegal.

GUTFELD: Yes. But they'll never see because they never touch their money.

PERINO: They don't have to.

GUTFELD: All right. We've got to go.

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