THE FIVE

Celebrity Sheep vs. Big Oil

Julia Louis-Dreyfus opposes Keystone XL pipeline

 

This is a rush transcript from "The Five," November 7, 2011. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

GREG GUTFELD, CO-HOST: So, you are filthy rich, bored, and haven't had a hit in years. What do you do? Why not oppose a pipeline.

Here is Julia Louis-Dreyfus opposing a pipeline.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP FROM TARSANDSACTION.ORG)

JULIA LOUIS-DREYFUS, ACTRESS: Remember when President Obama said let us be the generation that ends the tyranny of oil? Man, that was great. Except, I just checked, and right now, big oil is still pretty much running the show.

See, an international pipeline like this one needs a permit directly from you, the president of the United States, the commander-in-chief. The big cheese.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GUTFELD: I learned so much just then. Did she just say "big oil"? Somehow, I don't think she gets around on a solar-powered windmill.

Where do these dupes think energy comes from? Stephen Spielberg's magic wand?

Now, the pipeline will go from Canada to the Gulf Coast, providing not only fuel but jobs. That's a nice little map.

But Dreyfus doesn't care. The need to feel important trumps the needs of our country. Worse, her many millions allow her endless time to read Wikipedia and then lecture President Obama like she's some kind of expert.

You know she never heard of the pipeline until Leo DiCaprio tweeted about it in between models. And that's the real point. Celebs are sheep. All it takes is one of them to find an anti-consumptive cause and they fall in line like drugged-out dominoes. Funny how actors never care during those lean years when they focused only on making it big and making bank. Back then, oil got them to every audition.

Now famous, their brain stunted in adolescent romanticism, they embrace causes like they're Fendi bags made of coke, which is why this recession has got to end. These actors have to find work again just to shut their damn faces.

So, Eric, I came up with a compromise. So you can have the pipeline and environmentalists can be happy. Paint the pipeline green.

ERIC BOLLING, CO-HOST: That's it!

In fact, can I just point something out, the Alaskan pipeline, they were all worried about the caribou not accepting in their environment, the pipeline. They warm up next to it. They snuggle up to it.

GUTFELD: Caribou loves oil.

BOLLING: Julia, what's her name? Julia Louis-Dreyfus?

GUTFELD: Yes.

BOLLING: She just --

DANA PERINO, CO-HOST: Yes, whoever.

BOLLING: Last time she checked -- last time I checked, under Obama, the price of a gallon of gasoline went from $1.83 to $3.40.

PERINO: But she wants that. But they want that. They think -- because they believe that the higher the gasoline price, then people will use it less and then, all of a sudden, we'll be riding around on magic windmills.

GUTFELD: If only she can afford it. So, that's OK. We can't, but she can, Bob.

BOB BECKEL, CO-HOST: Reached $3.40 under Obama, that's his responsibility. It had nothing to do with big oil or oil traders.

The thing I find interesting about this, is that I happen to support this pipeline. But the conservative governor of Nebraska, very conservative, is against it. It's not just a bunch of Hollywood lefties.

The other thing is that State Department is supposed to give the final OK. The White House is taking it inside. And guess what? They are asking for more study and more review. Which means that the decision will happen, when?

ANDREA TANTAROS, CO-HOST: After the election.

BECKEL: About 2013.

PERINO: Last week in North Carolina, when President Obama did local interviews, he said I personally will make the final decision. I thought that was such bad process because -- well, I do think that the Hollywood folks that go down, and they're going to do a circle around the White House, this actually helps President Obama. It makes him look imminently reasonable.

TANTAROS: Well, what I think is so interesting is the Dem on Dem violence going on over this thing, right? So, he's likely going to punt it until after the election, which could make him look like he can't take a stand on anything. But think about it, the unions back this pipeline.

GUTFELD: Right.

TANTAROS: But environmentalists and the Hollywood elites, another sect of his base, they block it.

So, he actually has this infighting, what is he going to do? Again, he's going to punt it. He shouldn't though. It could create 50,000 jobs.

(CROSSTALK)

BECKEL: Do you know that the largest number of decisions that are made in White Houses are in the second term in December? That's when they all come out because they're all put off for election year. Of course he's going to put it off. Of course he should put it off.

(CROSSTALK)

BOLLING: I think he is going to help him.

GUTFELD: It would help him if he did it.

PERINO: I agree.

BOLLING: That is not what the pipeline is. This is taking Canadian oil and running it through America, creating some jobs and dumping it. We're still buying foreign oil. This is not going to help our dependence on foreign oil.

GUTFELD: But they're nice people. That's the thing. It's friendly oil.

BECKEL: Is it true, though, it is the most caustic kind of oil that you can get.

BOLLING: It's thick. It's a heavier oil.

GUTFELD: But it smells like bacon.

BECKEL: That's (INAUDIBLE) all over again.

TANTAROS: Another reason for the Hollywood elite to hate it.

GUTFELD: Exactly.

Hey, I just want to touch on -- speaking of oil, I'm going to talk about Iran. The International Atomic Energy Agency or IAEA, set to issue a report with detailed intelligence pointing to research and experiments in Iran that they may be developing nuclear bombs.

What do you make of this, Bob?

BECKEL: The, I -- no, I will tell you what they found. This is significant. They found that the centrifuges to make the plutonium have been increased, much more sophisticated. But the most important finding is that the help is coming not just from the North Koreans but from the Pakistanis -- our supposed allies in that part of the world, and they have the ability to do that.

Now, the one thing Iranians are also doing is moving everything underground and developing a missile that can handle nuclear warheads. And the most complicated part of a nuclear bomb is how you trigger it. And they now have the trigger capability. At some point, in the not-too-distant future, somebody is going to make decision we're going to take it out.

BOLLING: I think there is a huge, huge story because I agree with most things that Bob said, except for the part where the centrifuges actually make the plutonium. But that's OK.

But this is going to be big, what it's going to do is it's going to tell

-- I guess it's going to change rhetoric of dialogue where we stand with regard to Israel bombing Iran. So, if they are close to having nuclear weapon, do we pave the way for Israel to go, or do we --

PERINO: Foreign policy of the United States through all the administrations I know of have been the same on support of Israel, preference is to solve things peacefully. One of the problems is you cannot bomb knowledge out of a country. When Israel bombed Syria, the facility that the Syrians had worked on with the North Koreans, it was above ground, they took it out. No one in the world said anything.

BECKEL: This is going to require bunker-busting bombs and that only the United States has. It can only be dropped from the B-1 bombers. And I think the Israelis don't have them, which the United States may have to (INAUDIBLE).

TANTAROS: This is also going to require leadership. This is not something I think that the president can punt on.

PERINO: Lead from behind.

TANTAROS: But, politically, him finally coming and defending Israel and really standing with Israel on this one actually might help him with the Jewish vote, which he has lost considerably.

BECKEL: He has been defending Israel for the last three years.

TANTAROS: That's up for debate.

GUTFELD: I think the solution we can all agree on -- the solution we call all agree on, send Julia Louis-Dreyfus to negotiate this.

TANTAROS: Elaine?

GUTFELD: Yes, Elaine.

PERINO: It was hard to take her seriously. I thought she was going to make a joke.

BECKEL: Was his name George?

GUTFELD: George would drive them absolutely nuts. That's a good idea.

BOLLING: Kramer would get it done.

GUTFELD: All right.

TANTAROS: I really thought Kramer was going to show up.

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