Robots

Elon Musk says artificial intelligence will beat humans at 'everything' by 2030

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The performance of humans’ puny brains will be outmatched by computers within just 13 years, billionaire Elon Musk has claimed.

The Tesla and SpaceX founder said that artificial intelligence will beat us at just about everything by 2030.

He made the comments on Twitter, where he was responding to a new study which claims our race will be overtaken by 2060.

“Probably closer to 2030 to 2040 in my opinion,” he wrote.

According to the terrifying research from boffs at the University of Oxford, it’s not looking good for us humans.

Machines will be better than us at translating languages by 2024 and writing school essays by 2026, they claimed.

Within ten years computers will be better at driving a truck than us and by 2031 they will be better at selling goods and will put millions of retail workers on the dole queue.

AI will write a bestselling book by 2049 and conduct surgery by 2053, the researchers suggested.

In fact, every single human job will be automated within the next 120 years, according to computer experts the university researchers quizzed.

It's unlikely to trouble the billionaire tech entrepreneur, however.

Musk already has plans to plug our brains into computers.

He recently launched a new neuroscience company which aims to develop cranial computers that can download thoughts and possibly even treat disorders such as epilepsy and depression, the New York Post reported.

Over the years, the 45-year-old has conjured up new ideas for space rockets and electric-cars, proven that they can work efficiently, and then rolled them out for public and private use.

He's even hoping to start a human colony on Mars by 2030.

He's not alone in his estimations for the great computer takeover, either.

Scientists reckon humans are on the brink of a new evolutionary shift – and man as we know it "probably won't survive".

In a terrifying advance, some have warned that computers are so advanced, those developing the complex formulas that make them "tick" aren't even sure how they work.

And because they cannot understand the mechanical brains they have built, they fear that we could lose control of them altogether.

That means they could behave unexpectedly - potentially putting lives at risk.

Take the case of driverless cars, for example where an algorithm might behave differently to normal and cause a crash.