Carrots may be good for the eyes, but turns out that leafy green vegetables and colored fruits can also help your vision. These foods contain carotenoids which play an important role in eyesight and have a positive impact on the retina:

Green leafy vegetables and colored fruits may affect visual performance and may prevent age-related eye diseases, according to a new study in the Journal of Food Science.

These foods contain the carotenoids such as lutein and zeaxanthin, which play an important role in vision and have a positive impact on the retina, scientists led by Billy R. Hammond, PhD, a professor of neuroscience and experimental psychology at the University of Georgia, say in a review of previous research.

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Eating a handful of nuts a day can boost your heart health. Walnuts, almonds, pistachios -- almost any kind – contain nutrients that reduce the risk of developing blood clots and help with cholesterol control. So go ahead, go a little nuts:

Most nuts contain some nutrients that can benefit heart health and help with cholesterol control. They include unsaturated fats, omega-3 fatty acids, fiber, 1-arginine and plant sterols. Nuts have been shown to reduce low-density lipoproteins (LDL, or "bad" cholesterol) levels in the blood. Eating nuts also can reduce the risk of developing blood clots and improve the health of the lining of the arteries. These benefits suggest that eating nuts, in limited amounts, may reduce the risk of heart disease, though studies haven't yet proved this conclusively.

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Here's a new weapon in the battle of the bulge: Scientists are working on developing food that releases anti-hunger aromas during chewing. The aromas would signal the feeling of fullness to the brain and prevent people from overeating:

Rianne Ruijschop and colleagues note that scientists long have tried to develop tasty foods that trigger or boost the feeling of fullness. Until recently, that research focused on food's effects in stomach after people swallow it. Efforts now have expanded to include foods that release hunger-quenching aromas during chewing. Molecules that make up a food's aroma apparently do so by activating areas of the brain that signal fullness.

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