A judge in Illinois has ordered investigators to return to Drew Peterson all items seized from his home — including firearms — within 30 days as the former police officer prepared for another appearance on the "Today" show.

Investigators took the property, which includes guns and computers, in November as they investigated the disappearance of Peterson's wife, Stacy.

The Illinois Department of State Police said that it has revoked Peterson's Firearm Owners Identification Card.

The department sent a letter to Peterson on Wednesday informing him, as well his lawyer of the revocation, according to a press release from the Will County States Attorneys Office

Peterson was preparing for a trip to New York and an appearance on the "Today" show, the Herald News reported Wednesday.

"I ain't talking to nobody till after Thursday," Peterson told the paper.

The former Bolingbrook police officer — who has been named a suspect in Stacy Peterson's October disappearance, but hasn't been charged with any crime and denies having anything to do with her disappearance — plans to fly to New York for a Thursday morning television appearance.

Peterson planned to spend the night in the Big Apple, eat out and catch a movie, the paper said.

Will County Judge Richard Schoenstedt made the ruling on Peterson's property during a Wednesday morning hearing. The only condition is that Peterson must agree not to challenge the validity of photographs of the property or documents related to them at any future trial.

The former Bolingbrook police officer has been named a suspect in Stacy Peterson's October disappearance. He hasn't been charged with any crime and denies having anything to do with her disappearance.

Last week, a coroner ruled Peterson's third wife, Kathleen Savio, died by drowning and her death was ruled a homicide. She was found dead in her bathtub in March 2004, shortly before her divorce with Peterson was finalized. Four years ago, a coroner's jury ruled her death was an accident.

Peterson, 54, has denied any involvement in either case and has not been charged with wrongdoing. He was a sergeant and 29-year veteran in the Bolingbrook, Ill., police department when he resigned after coming under suspicion in Stacy Peterson's disappearance.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Click here for a report in the Herald News.