This is a rush transcript from "On the Record ," February 11, 2008. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

GRETA VAN SUSTEREN, HOST: There's more news tonight in the Natalee Holloway case. The prosecutor's office is fighting to get Joran van der Sloot under arrest and back in jail in Aruba, and it's up to Joran's lawyers to fight this new appeal from the prosecutor. What are Joran's lawyers up to, and what will they say to keep him out of jail?

Joining us live in Aruba is Jossy Mansur, managing editor of Diario newspaper. Jossy, where does it stand? The prosecutor lost his first round effort to lock up Joran, and he then appealed it to three judges. Where does it stand now?

JOSSY MANSUR, MANAGING EDITOR, "DIARIO": Well, it stands that the three judges have accepted that the defense lawyers for Joran will present whatever arguments they have to put obstacles in this arrest. And they have until Wednesday, the 13th of this week. And by week's end, they will issue a decision as to whether they will allow the re-arrest of Joran or not.

VAN SUSTEREN: Now, the judges — is that certain that the judge will issue a decision, the three-judge panel, by Thursday or Friday, or is that just what everyone, the prosecutor thinks is going to happen?

MANSUR: No, that's what we got in the press release that the prosecution issued today.

VAN SUSTEREN: Where is Joran? Is he still in Holland?

MANSUR: He's still in Holland.

VAN SUSTEREN: And considered a persona non grata, at least by one influential person in the government in Aruba, right?

MANSUR: Right.

VAN SUSTEREN: What does that mean?

MANSUR: I don't know. He's been declared that, but we don't know exactly what it means. Legally, it's impossible to stop him from coming to Aruba because he's a legal resident here. What it does mean (INAUDIBLE) is that the attitude of people who were standing behind him before has changed, and they all want to see this man leave the island.

VAN SUSTEREN: Where are his parents? Are they still on the island?

MANSUR: Yes, they are.

VAN SUSTEREN: And what is his father doing for a living?

MANSUR: Well, he's a practicing attorney.

VAN SUSTEREN: With who? He was practicing, at least with one of Joran's former lawyers. Is that still the arrangement?

MANSUR: Yes, that's still the arrangement. I think he works out of the office of Antonio Carlo.

VAN SUSTEREN: Has there been sort of a whole sweeping change in sort of view among Arubans? And it's a terrible thing to sort of generalize, but I — at least I always thought that towards the end, that people were not too pleased with Natalee Holloway's mother coming there and they sort of thought that Joran was a victim. First, am I sort of right about that? And secondly, has that changed?

MANSUR: No, that has changed quite a bit because many people that used to criticize her, even on the radio talk shows, now have apologized publicly to Beth because they understand now what she went through. And they understand now, after seeing the videotape of De Vries, what happened to this girl because Joran for once has admitted that he was with her at the moment that she died and that he ordered the disposal of her body.

VAN SUSTEREN: Do you hear anyone supporting Joran's now statement in which he says that he was under the influence of marijuana and lying? Is there any sort of support for him that way in Aruba?

MANSUR: Absolutely none. From all the reactions we have received, he is being severely criticized for issuing this very (INAUDIBLE) excuse for what he said on that recording.

VAN SUSTEREN: In listening to the statement, I think, if I'm correct, that he's silent as to the Kalpoe brothers. They seem to be totally out of the picture. Is that your understanding, that no one is at least casting any sort of suspicion on them at this point?

MANSUR: That's what I understand from (INAUDIBLE) in which he issued this statement, this latest statement. But that doesn't mean that they're clear with the prosecution.

VAN SUSTEREN: But the prosecutor is not seeking to arrest Deepak Satish Kalpoe.

MANSUR: No, they're not. But we have to remember, Greta, that Deepak once said in a car, in a police car, that if they ever found the girl or whatever remains of her, that Joran would be look at 15 years in prison. How could he know that or how could he guess that if he didn't know what happened to the girl?

VAN SUSTEREN: I guess, knowing it, though, if he'd had a conversation with Joran and being told by Joran doesn't make him culpable. But anyway, we'll — there's still so much more to be known on this. Jossy, thank you.

MANSUR: Welcome.

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