Hillary Clinton will have a blowout bash in Manhattan Thursday night to round out her sixth decade on the planet, a follow-up to a high-rolling fundraiser earlier this week hosted by Hollywood big shots.

The headliner for Clinton's 60th birthday party at the Beacon Theater is rocker Elvis Costello. He'll be introduced by Billy Crystal. But the real star power may be Clinton's husband and former president, Bill Clinton.

Either way, plenty of glitz will be offered up in New York's Upper West Side as well as plenty of cash. Orchestra seats for the event reportedly cost the maximum campaign contribution of $2,300 per guest. Balcony spots were priced at $100. A crowd of 2,500 is expected.

Thursday's party isn't the first day this week the senator's birthday has been celebrated. On Sunday, director Rob Reiner sang, "Happy Birthday, Mrs. President" — a variation on Marilyn Monroe's saccharine ode to President Kennedy in 1962 — at a fundraiser at his Brentwood, Calif., home that drew roughly $500,000 for her presidential campaign.

Clinton campaign manager Patti Solis Doyle has also invited supporters through the campaign Web site to sign an e-card for her boss, and even a potential Republican competitor offered his well-wishes.

"Happy birthday, Senator Clinton. Now we are both over the hill," GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney said Thursday in Manchester, N.H.

Clinton's friends aren't the only ones celebrating her big day, however. A new documentary being released by a political foe is also scheduled for release on Friday — Clinton's true birthday.

And the Republican National Committee took the opportunity to wish good riddance to Clinton's style of government.

“While Hillary Clinton may be wishing for government-run health care, Washington-controlled retirement plans, and budget-busting baby bonds, the American people are wishing they won’t have to pay for Clinton's $750 billion in additional spending," RNC spokesman Danny Diaz said.

If she is worried about hitting the big 6-0, Clinton isn't showing it.

"Sixty is the new 50," she said at an AARP convention earlier this year. Joking about her male rivals in the presidential race, she has stated she's grateful at her age to get so much attention from men.