This is a rush transcript from "The O'Reilly Factor," October 8, 2007. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

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BILL O'REILLY, HOST: The top story tonight: rocker Bruce Springsteen also believes the U.S. is torturing people.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN, MUSICIAN: We've see things that have happened over the past six years that I did not think anybody ever thought they'd ever see in the United States. When people think of the American identity, they don't think of torture. They don't think of illegal wiretapping. They don't think of voter suppression. They don't think of no habeas corpus, no right to a lawyer, you know.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

O'REILLY: Yes, I don't know Mr. Springsteen, but I'd like him to back up his statements at least. So I've offered to donate $25,000 to Habitat for Humanity if Mr. Springsteen enters the no spin zone. We are not expecting a positive response from him.

But joining us now from Austin, Texas is another outspoken entertainer, Kinky Friedman, the author of the brand new book "You Can Lead a Politician to Water, but You Can't Make Him Think." Could you throw in you could lead a politician to water and an entertainer, but you can't make them think?

KINKY FRIEDMAN, MUSICIAN AND AUTHOR: Well, Bill, Bill, Bill, let me — as far as Bruce is concerned, you know, I mean, I've met the guy on one occasion and I think it was in '75 or something. And I was at that time touring with Bob Dylan. And I was flying on 11 different kinds of herbs and spices I guess.

And I refused to shake hands with him for some reason. And I got seven years of bad luck following that. So I'd like to make it up to Bruce.

I have to tell you, Bill, we should distinguish when you talk about celebrities and musicians that write their own words and music and have been, you know, veteran souls for decades that have been speaking to people. I think Bruce is a thoughtful man. And what he has to say is important. And — I mean, not that he's right on target, but he's not a diva. He's not a Justin Timberlake or a Barbra Streisand.

O'REILLY: No, but he is been consistently liberal and has been for decades, which is fine. I don't mind that.

But you know, you know, you put yourself in a position, and I want your opinion on this, of Springsteen using his music and his talent to try to persuade people that his view of the world is right.

And that can be dangerous, Mr. Friedman, as I just said, in the War on Terror. You know, Mr. Springsteen objects to almost every anti-terror measure put in place since 9/11. Almost every single one. Yet, he won't come into a forum like this and answer any questions about it. I think that's irresponsible.

But I also think that Bruce Springsteen and others like him have an effect on how 18 to 35 year-old Americans, that age group primarily...

FRIEDMAN: Yes.

O'REILLY: ...think about their country and actually vote. Am I wrong?

FRIEDMAN: No, you're not. I mean, but art — I think Bob Dylan said that art should not reflect a culture, it should subvert it. And Bruce, you've got to hand one thing to a guy like that. And I would put Neil Young in there and a whole host of musicians that inspire people, Bill.

And if I make this a Talmudic question, I'd ask you what living politician inspires you? I mean, present company excluded. Tell me...

O'REILLY: Look, you're right about the charisma. And you're right about the talent that these men have. And that's why I'm doing this story, Mr. Friedman.

The power that they have, and a lot of viewers don't understand this. They say why do we care what Bruce Springsteen says? Why do we care what Neil Young says?

And the reason is because these men command, in an age group that votes, a lot of influence. Much more influence than the Speaker of the House, the president of the Senate, or anybody else.

And I say if Bruce Springsteen wants to undermine anti-terror measures, he has a responsibility to come in here and other places and explain it. Not just to do "drive by' stuff.

FRIEDMAN: Yes. Well, that totally I can't argue with that at all. I can — you know, I can just say that these — the ones I'm speaking of, I mean, like Bob Dylan's — Bob Dylan, "The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll," for instance. I mean, now that was protest songs.

I'm not sure that Bruce putting these political ideas into music is best foot forward or not. I don't know. I haven't heard the CD. But as far as him saying something, it's like I said in my campaign for governor. Musicians can run this place better than politicians.

O'REILLY: I'm not sure about that, I mean, present company excepted. I mean, you did — you got a few votes in your gubernatorial run in Texas. But look...

FRIEDMAN: Oh, come on. God wouldn't have won this race as an independent.

O'REILLY: OK. But you are a different character, Mr. Friedman. You are willing to come in and debate and put forth your point of view and have people say yes or no.

Springsteen isn't. Most of these pinheads aren't. They're "drive-by" guys who hear the same thing from all the people around them, who go out and say...

FRIEDMAN: Yes.

O'REILLY: ...America is a torture nation, no habeas corpus. We're eavesdropping on everybody. It's bull. It's bull, Mr. Friedman. It isn't happening. It's out of context. Bruce Springsteen doesn't know what he's talking about. I'll give $25K to Habitat for Humanity if he'll come in and sit here. And you know why he won't come in and sit here? Because he knows that I'd wipe him out. He couldn't stand up to the questioning. And we'd be respectful. We're respectful to you.

FRIEDMAN: Well...

O'REILLY: But he knows it. And I think he is irresponsible. I'll give you the last word.

FRIEDMAN: Well, I think he should come on "The Factor", too. But a man who's been on "The Factor" a lot is your friend, Al Sharpton. And his only — Al's only problem is that everybody he attacks just happens to be white. And they just happen to be innocent. Other than that, he's doing a great job. He's a professional, political activist.

O'REILLY: Like or him or not, Sharpton comes in and he takes a lot of garbage from me. I don't give him a free pass.

All right, well we'll look forward to Bruce Springsteen coming in. And again, $25,000 to Habitat for Humanity if he does.

FRIEDMAN: There you go.

O'REILLY: That builds a lot of houses for poor people, Bruce. So if you're a man, come on in here. And I don't mean that in a bad way. I really don't. You'll be treated with respect, but I'm tired of this kind of stuff. Mr. Friedman, thanks very much. — Read his book. It's a very good read.

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