Some colleges and universities might be reluctant in reporting student visa problems, which could hamper terror investigations, Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff said.

Speaking before a House Homeland Security Committee hearing on Capitol Hill Wednesday, Chertoff faced a question from Rep. Gus Bilirakis, R-Fla., about last week's terror-related arrests of two Egyptian-born students at the University of South Florida, according to The Tampa Tribune.

"I think some schools are reluctant to report students who drop below their course requirement or make themselves absent, because they don't want to see themselves as enforcement tools for the U.S. government. I think that the danger is that that creates a vulnerability in the program. And as a consequence, we do have to sanction schools. And I'm not hesitant to do so," Chertoff said.

Click here to read the full report in The Tampa Tribune.

Two men -- Auhmed Mohamed and Youssef Megahed -- were arrested in August and were accused of explosives possession. According to the indictment, Mohamed tried to help terrorists by aiding, teaching and demonstrating the use of explosive devices. That student was at the University of South Florida on an F-1 student visa, approved by DHS.