Walk and chew gum at the same time? How about drive and watch porn at the same time? Now that's talent.

DWP, also known as driving with porn, appears to be the newest craze plaguing American highways.

Tracy Pope of Aiken, S.C., was recently arrested for watching an X-rated DVD on his car's video system while he was driving, reported News 10 of Tampa Bay, Fla.

Pope faces several charges, including promoting obscenity due to the fact that a child could have looked over and caught an eyeful of the XXX action. Cops also seized several other X-rated DVDs from his car.

Serves You Right for Being a Good Samaritan!

MESA, Ariz. (AP) — People got behind and pushed and even offered an impromptu driving lesson to help a boy who was struggling to drive a car — failing to realize that the 14-year-old was stealing the vehicle, police said.

The boy stopped mid-getaway Wednesday to ask for help, and at least 15 people responded, according to Phoenix police. Police said the boy then got stuck in reverse, and more neighbors helped push the car.

When he still couldn't figure out how to operate the manual transmission, police said he asked a passer-by for an impromptu driving lesson. Margarita Wood tried to give him directions through the car window and finally climbed in to help.

Police said none of the would-be Samaritans realized the vehicle was stolen or that the driver was underage.

"It is incredible that an entire neighborhood would participate in this comedy of errors," said Sgt. Dave Norton.

Police caught up with the boy after some city workers and other residents spotted the erratic driver and called 911. The teenager was taken into custody, as was the woman teaching him to drive. The woman was released.

Police said the car belongs to a friend of the boy with whom he had been staying. The owner declined to press charges.

The boy was given citations and released to his grandmother.

Extra Helping of Chicken Feet, Anyone?

SOMERSET, Pennsylvania (AP) — Henrietta the chicken was living inconspicuously for 18 months among 36,000 other chickens at Brendle Farms — until a farm foreman discovered she had four legs.

Farm-owner Mike Brendle was amazed by the discovery among his standard two-legged, egg-laying hens.

"It's as healthy as the rest," he said.

Brendle's 13-year-old daughter, Ashley, named the bird Henrietta after the discovery. It has two normal front legs and, behind those, two more feet. They are of a similar size to the chicken's front legs, but do not function. The chicken drags her extra feet behind her.

Brendle said he has never seen a chicken with four legs before. He moves 36,000 chickens through his farm three times a year and has been farming for 30 years.

There is no definitive reason behind such deformities, said Cliff Thompson, a retired professor of genetics at the University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown. He said it could be an accident of development, akin to a sixth toe on a cat.

Brendle said he jokingly suggested to his family they sell Henrietta in an Internet auction, but Ashley objected.

Someone Really Likes Frozen Drumsticks …

WAUKESHA, Wis. (AP) — A recovered semitrailer missing its 8,000-pound cargo of frozen food has authorities wondering, "Where's the beef?"

Authorities said they recovered the stolen semitrailer late Wednesday, but the food wasn't there.
The food, mostly poultry, was valued at $11,000, Waukesha Police Capt. Mike Babe said Thursday. The 30-foot truck also contained 11 cases of high-end meat worth $250 a case, he said.

The vehicle was taken from Dierks Waukesha, a food distribution company, early Wednesday. An employee said he saw a man he did not recognize drive off with the truck at 4:50 a.m.

Later that night, authorities received an anonymous phone call saying that the truck was in Milwaukee, Babe said. Milwaukee police then confirmed it was the missing vehicle.

Happy to Say 'I Told You So!'

MURFREESBORO, Ark. (AP) — A Tennessee woman whose husband predicted she wouldn't have any luck gem hunting at Arkansas' Crater of Diamonds State Park made a sparkling discovery: a 1.3-carat diamond.

"I wasn't expecting to find anything and was just picking up pretty rocks," said Melissa Lacey of Knoxville.

At first, she thought the light yellow diamond was "a piece of dirty quartz." After it was identified by park staff, Lacey said she couldn't wait to show it to her husband.

The diamond was the size of a piece of candy corn. The largest diamond ever discovered in the U.S. was unearthed at the state park in 1924. Named the Uncle Sam, the white diamond weighed 40.23 carats.

A freshly dug trench was opened to the public on Saturday. Lacey found her diamond Thursday in soil from the trench that was spread out over parts of the diamond field.

The Crater of Diamonds State Park is the world's only publicly operated diamond site where the public is allowed to search and keep any gems found, regardless of their value.

A 1.22-carat diamond found last year was estimated to be worth $1,000 uncut. The value could be increased depending on the way the diamond cut.

Compiled by FOXNews.com's Hannah Sentenac.

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