I've gotten a flood of e-mail supporting my book, "The War on Christmas."

There have been hundreds and hundreds of these short notes from readers of the Focus on the Family newsletter, which ran a story about my book and encouraged readers to write to me.

Thanks to all of you for your notes. I'm almost positive I won't be able to answer them all.

The people writing almost all tell a story from their own lives in which they feel Christmas — the Christian holiday part of it — has been pushed into the background or in some cases pushed completely out of sight.

They are glad someone has finally noticed that the political correctness police have come down on Christmas.

You only have to look at what's going on in the major consumer outlets, the department stores and big corporations like Coke. The phrase "Merry Christmas" banished. Santa dumped from the Coke cans.

And this story out of Scotland, where they start the Christmas fighting early.

There a small town spent $5,000 on Christmas lights and were all set for the annual Christmas lights ceremony.

Then somebody said, "Uh oh. The word Christmas shouldn't be there." All of a sudden the "Christmas Lights Festival" is the "Festival of Lights."

Soon here in the United States the annual battles over Christmas in schools, in public parks, in libraries and other publicly owned facilities will erupt and loud non-season voices will be shouting at each other.

It's usually just after Thanksgiving, when the schools announce their plans and policies for the Christmas season — rather the holiday season.

I tell a bunch of these stories in my book, "The War on Christmas." But my favorite from this year occurred right on this network a week or so ago.

This issue was being argued and a secularist lawyer said something along the lines of the following: "When it comes to schools, if the Christmas holiday happens to fall during the winter break, fine, the Christian kids can have their Christmas holiday."

Of course, what he left out is that the Christmas holiday is always during the winter break because it used to be called the Christmas break and it is the time when most of the kids will not be in school, and most of the teachers and administrators won't be there either. So the school might as well close.

But the lawyer's point is worth considering. This is what they do. They rename something. The Christmas break has become the holiday break, and the next step is to deny the thing they renamed ever really existed anyway.

So now it really is the winter break, as if the kids who no longer celebrate or observe Christmas would automatically become ancient Germanic pagans and start worshipping winter.

I tell a bunch of these stories in "The War on Christmas." My favorite is still the school district in Texas which outlawed the colors red and green.

Yes, I know, I didn't believe it as first either.

It's already started in Britain. It's only a matter of days before it crosses the pond and starts up again here.

That's My Word.

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