All of the statements Phil Spector (search) made the night an actress was shot to death in his home may be used by prosecutors at his trial, a judge ruled Thursday.

Among the most critical comments was one overheard by a policewoman who said the 65-year-old music producer declared, "I didn't mean to shoot her. It was an accident."

Lana Clarkson's (search) body was found Feb. 3, 2003, at Spector's castle-like home after a limousine driver heard a gun go off and called for police.

Judge Larry Paul Fidler ruled Spector made the statements to police spontaneously and wasn't being interrogated. And although it was clear Spector was asking for his lawyer at the time, the judge said police did not press him for information before attorney Robert Shapiro arrived.

Fidler said anything construed to be an admission had to be offered by the prosecution, not by Spector's lawyers. Spector's version of events may be introduced by the defense only if he testifies.

Prosecutor Douglas Sortino said he does not plan to use statements Spector made at the police station, including his claim that Clarkson committed suicide.

Spector's attorney, Bruce Cutler (search), noted that by the time the policewoman said she overheard Spector's statement, he had been subdued by police using a stun gun. He also argued that Spector was sleep deprived, intoxicated and had not taken his various medications.

"We deny in the clearest terms that he ever confessed to shooting the lady," said Cutler.

Spector, known for creating rock music's "wall of sound," has pleaded not guilty and is free on $1 million bail. He faces life in prison if convicted.

Clarkson, 40, starred in Roger Corman's cult film classic "Barbarian Queen" and had been working as a hostess at the House of Blues on the Sunset Strip.

Spector spoke only once during the hearing, answering, "Yes sir," when the judge asked if he waived his right to a speedy trial. He appeared shaken as he left the courtroom. He leaned heavily on the arm of a woman lawyer who accompanied him with three bodyguards.

The judge set two different trial dates, Jan. 30 and April 24, contingent on the disposition of another murder case Spector's attorney is handling.

Fidler also scheduled a Dec. 2 pretrial hearing.