The Quran commands Muslim women to cover themselves in the presence of non-relatives.

So when A'isha Samad of Cleveland, Ohio, went without her headscarf, it was not by choice.

"It is a protection of [my] modesty," said Samad. "It's no different [than] if I didn't have a blouse on."

Samad's self-proclaimed nightmare began two years ago when she failed to appear in court for a hearing related to the custody of a grandchild.

A judge ordered her to be detained in the county jail, where she was forced to remove her headscarf.

For security reasons, guards remove everything from inmates entering the jail.

"Contraband and security play such a vital role here that that's almost the first thing that gets triggered at intake," said Ken Kochevar of the Cuyahoga County Correctional Center (search).

But Samad had no criminal history. In fact, charges against her were eventually dropped.

She says she asked for the same covering privileges the jail grants Muslim men, but her request was denied.

Now she's suing the county for discrimination.

Corrections officials deny Samad's mistreatment was intentional. The jail now has approved headscarves available for Muslim women.

"Ethically and morally, I think we have an obligation to recognize that we erred. We're sorry," said Kochevar.

But is a sorry sufficient in this case?

Samad doesn't think so.

"This was the worst experience of my life," she said.

Kochevar said, "I would like to think that there's satisfaction she can receive on her part knowing she changed the system."

But Samad says not before the system changed her.

If a jury agrees, she could be paid thousands of dollars for the weekend in jail she spent uncovered.

Click on the video box near the top of this story to watch a report by FOX News' Jeff Goldblatt.