The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (search) needs to change its name to the NAABB. That would stand for the National Association for the Advancement of Bush-Bashing.

At its convention this week in Philadelphia, the nation's oldest and largest self-styled civil rights group resembled a warm-up act for the Democratic National Convention. NAABB President Kweise Mfume (search) sounded like one of those right-wing conspiracy groups that believed fluoridation was a communist plot when he said that conservative black organizations are formed and funded by white Republicans.

White racists once thought all blacks look alike. Now Mr. Mfume wants us to think that all blacks should think alike and if they don't, they are, in the words of NAABB Chairman Julian Bond, "Ventriloquist's dummies, they speak in their puppet master's voice, but we can see his lips move and we can hear his money talk"

You may recall that the NAACP was behind that political commercial in 2000 that suggested George W. Bush was indifferent to the murder of a black Texan who had been dragged behind a pickup truck driven by whites. The men were convicted, but the NAACP used the incident as a campaign tool against the Bush presidential candidacy.

The NAACP was once a great organization, clearing the obstructions that discriminated against blacks and prevented them from enjoying equal opportunity. It is now a subsidiary of the Democratic Party.

My question is: How can this viciously partisan organization maintain its tax-exempt status? Probably for the same reason electioneering black churches maintain theirs: Politicians are afraid to be tarred with the "racist" label and so apply different standards to blacks than they do to others. Isn't this what the NAACP was supposed to be dedicated to eliminating? That was when it was the NAACP and not today's NAABB.

And that's Column One for this week.

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Cal Thomas is America's most widely syndicated op-ed columnist. He joined Fox News Channel in 1997 as a political contributor. His latest book is "What Works: Common Sense Solutions for a Stronger America" is available in bookstores now. Readers may email Cal Thomas at tcaeditors@tribune.com.