Howard Dean (search) is trying to get past the impassioned speech he delivered after the Iowa caucuses, but the image lingers on the Internet, late-night talk shows and in what could be a serious problem for the campaign -- among New Hampshire voters.

Political analysts and pollsters are watching to see if Monday night's enthusiastic, fist-pumping speech becomes one of those famous presidential campaign moments etched indelibly in the public's mind. Dean's own advisers privately acknowledge the speech was a major blunder that has hurt his standing in polls.

Dean's dive: Is this Howard's end?

A sample of your responses:

That was NOT a Rebel Yell! Trust me, us here Tennessee Volunteers know one when we hear it! It more closely resembled Ned Beatty's squeal from a certain 1970s movie...
Susie D.

Dean make a miserable mistake. But you and the rest of the media is being unnecessarily mean -- move on. I guess President Bush will have to face a real opponent. It was quite amusing to see the glum, forlorn looks of Republicans when they realized Dean 's hold on the nomination was slipping. Well, I guess the landslide scenario is moot.
Margaret T.
Sterling, VA

When you showed Howard Dean speaking without any volume the other morning, it reminded me of seeing Hitler speaking on the history channel. I think he is done and he has done it to himself.
James
Vero Beach, FL

Swan song!
Clarence K.
Battle Creek, MI

I think Dean would make a wonderful vice-president, since their principal function is to keep comedians in business, anyway. That's the problem with Dick Cheney (and Al Gore before him): he's just not ridiculous enough. We haven't had a good vice-president since Dan Quayle.
Jim
AL

I think Dean's done but I also think the media let the polls and his web success influence how popular he actually was to begin with. He looks good on paper but that's all I can give him credit for.
John M.
Independence, KY

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