This is a partial transcript of The Big Story With John Gibson, September 16, 2003, that has been edited for clarity.

JOHN GIBSON, HOST: We don't see too many of the Democratic candidates around The Big Story, so we try to get a picture of these politicians by talking to their handlers and supporters. And there are some strange bedfellows out there.

Heather Nauert is here with a Kerry supporter.

HEATHER NAUERT, CORRESPONDENT: That's right. His name is Moby (search) and he is known for his techno music and political opinions. Hint — the animal rights group PETA (search) loves him. And he is betting that he can get young voters and his fans to support John Kerry for the Democratic nomination.

Earlier today I asked him why is he supporting John Kerry (search) and that's today's big question.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

MOBY, MUSICIAN: Well, I mean, the Senate traditionally is sort of a patrician environment and John Kerry is very wise, and he has a lot of experience and he's certainly — I think — the brightest of all the people running. But one thing I'm hoping to bring to it is just sort of to draw more awareness to his campaign and, you know, make younger people realize that, ideologically, they probably have a lot more in common with John Kerry than they might imagine.

NAUERT: What do you think John Kerry maybe should do to further get out there and try to drive the vote? I mean, right now, he's still — at least according to a lot of polls — falling behind [Howard] Dean, who has been getting so much attention lately.

MOBY: Yes. Well, it's still such early days. You have to remember in 2000, at this point, Bill Clinton had just declared his presidency. So it's still such early days. I don't think he can take the polls too seriously and what John Kerry can do is basically what he's doing, is just getting out there and letting people know that he is the best person running for president.

NAUERT: Kerry is not known for being sort of the warmest guy, we'll say. Did he sort of charm you? What was he like to you?

MOBY: Yes. It's funny. With John Kerry, he's a very warm person. He's very compassionate and you get the sense that he is not at all disingenuous. And I think when people talk about him not being warm, what they're saying is he's not as disingenuous as most politicians. Like when he speaks to you, you get the sense you're talking to a real person and not just a political machine.

NAUERT: Is this your first foray into politics or something you have been doing for a while?

MOBY: Well, I've always been sort of a dilettante when it comes to politics, standing on the sidelines and paying attention. But I think this election is so important, and think that George Bush is so dreadful for our country. Again, I'm not saying that in a partisan way. Looking at it from a Republican perspective, he's dreadful, and looked at it from a Democratic perspective, he's dreadful. My goal in November of 2004 is just to see someone with experience, intelligence to be our next president.

NAUERT: Okay. Certainly there are a lot of voters out there who would disagree with you. But you are doing something that is not entirely unique in this day and age and that is that you're a celebrity, but you're getting out there as an activist. Are you ready to open yourself up to criticisms which so many celebrities are getting when they shoot off their mouths?

MOBY: Yes. There's a long tradition of celebrities being loud mouths and there is a long tradition of celebrities talking about things that they don't really understand. Hopefully, I'm not guilty of that. I think I'm relatively well acquainted with the issues. You don't have to be a rocket scientist to see that George Bush is bad for this country. The country is just — we're just in worst shape than we were when he took office and he's just pushing the country into the gutter. Anyone who can come along and rescue this country, I think they would have my support.

NAUERT: Okay. So you're looking for anybody. Let me ask you. A lot of artists today support the government and the industry cracking down on file sharing. But you have a different point of view on that? What do you think of that?

MOBY: Well, I think that file sharing really — it isn't the sort of boogieman that the record business is making it out to be. Because the people who are sharing files and downloading music are music fans. And the record industry is kind of a greedy industry, and as time has passed they've charged more and more and more for something people know can be recreated fairly cheaply. I don't support the illegal file sharing, but I certainly don't support the record industry cracking down on 12-year-old kids who are downloading their favorite songs.

NAUERT: All right. Great. Thanks so much for joining us. Moby, good luck to you.

MOBY: Oh, it was my pleasure, thanks.

NAUERT: And that was Moby joining us from his vegan health food restaurant in New York City earlier today. And by the way, he is going to be on the U.S.S. Intrepid, the old aircraft carrier here in New York City with John Kerry, strumming it up later this week.

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