Following are highlights of the $390 billion government-wide spending package the Senate debated on Wednesday. It covers the federal budget year that began Oct. 1. Included is how totals for each of the 11 bills included in the measure compares to last year's spending and to the amount Democrats proposed in bills they wrote — but never completed — last year.

—Agriculture and food programs: $74.2 billion, $1.1 billion over 2002 and $580 million below version Democrats wrote last year. Increases spending for food aid for women, infants and children over last year, provides less than Democrats proposed for agriculture research grants.

—Departments of Commerce, Justice, State: $47.1 billion, $2.5 billion over 2002 and $2.1 billion below Democrats. Extra money for training, equipment for local emergency agencies but $816 million less for domestic security than Democrats want. Securities and Exchange Commission can hire 700 new corporate fraud investigators, would get $657 million — $94 million less than Democrats wanted.

—Energy and water projects: $26.2 billion, $900 million over 2002 and $136 million less than Democrats. Army Corps of Engineers water projects $375 million above what President Bush requested. Provides $336 million for work on nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nev., $255 million less than Bush wants. Less than Democrats wanted for restoring Florida's Everglades.

—Foreign aid: $16.2 billion, $74 million below 2002 and $100 million below Democrats. Includes $2.7 billion economic and military aid for Israel; $1.9 billion for Egypt; $220 million for Afghanistan. Cuts aid to United Nations family planning program, controversial with conservatives because of its work in China, by $15 million below what Democrats want.

—Interior Department: $19 billion, $400 million below 2002 and $373 million below Democrats. Increases spending for national park maintenance though less than Democrats want.

—Labor, Health and Human Services, Education departments: $131.4 billion, $3.7 billion over 2002, $3 billion below Democrats. Includes $3.7 billion for combating bioterrorism, increases National Institutes of Health spending; less than Democrats want for education, job training, Head Start.

—Transportation Department: $64.6 billion, $400 million below Democrats. Includes $5.3 billion for new Transportation Security Administration, including money for explosive detection systems at airports, extra funds for Coast Guard.

—Veterans, housing, environment programs: $90.4 billion, $7.2 billion over 2002, $2.6 billion below Democrats. Provides less than Democrats want for domestic security, housing, national service.

—Treasury Department, general government: $34.5 billion, $700 million over 2002, $300 million below Democrats. Provides for 4.1 percent pay raise for federal civilian workers, 1 percent over what has already been enacted. Many agencies will have to trim various programs to make room in their budgets for the extra pay.

—Legislative branch: $2.34 billion, $66 million over 2002, $51 million below Democrats. Money for Capitol police pay raise, hiring new officers.

—District of Columbia: $512 million federal payments to the city, $96 million less than last year, about same as Democrats.