MLB

Mets acquire James Loney from Padres

ARLINGTON, TX - AUGUST 16: James Loney #21 of the Tampa Bay Rays runs to first base after hitting the ball in the game against the Texas Rangers at Globe Life Park in Arlington on August 16, 2015 in Arlington, Texas. The Texas Rangers defeated the Tampa Bay Rays 5-3. (Photo by John Williamson/MLB Photos via Getty Images)

ARLINGTON, TX - AUGUST 16: James Loney #21 of the Tampa Bay Rays runs to first base after hitting the ball in the game against the Texas Rangers at Globe Life Park in Arlington on August 16, 2015 in Arlington, Texas. The Texas Rangers defeated the Tampa Bay Rays 5-3. (Photo by John Williamson/MLB Photos via Getty Images)

The New York Mets have addressed their need for an everyday first basemen by acquiring veteran James Loney, FOX Sports' Ken Rosenthal has confirmed.

Source confirms: #Mets getting Loney. First reported: @AdamRubinESPN.

— Ken Rosenthal (@Ken_Rosenthal) May 28, 2016

The news was first reported by ESPN.

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Loney, who has been playing for the San Diego Padres' Triple-A affiliate all season, had an opt-out clause in his minor-league deal with San Diego that would allow him to leave the Padres organization to sign with a major-league team. It's still unclear whether the Mets acquired Loney in a trade with the Padres, or simply signed him to a big-league deal.

Loney tweeted the news Saturday afternoon -- even before ESPN broke the story.

I❤️NY

— James Loney (@theloney_s) May 28, 2016

Loney, 32, is expected to step right in to the Mets' lineup to fill the hole left by injured first baseman Lucas Duda, who is on the DL with a stress fracture in his back.

#Mets view Loney as LHH stopgap until Duda returns. Team likes his ability to make contact; Mets have fifth-highest K rate in majors.

— Ken Rosenthal (@Ken_Rosenthal) May 28, 2016

In 43 games with Triple-A El Paso, Loney posted a .342/.373/.424 line with two home runs. The 10-year veteran spent a majority of his career with the Tampa Bay Rays but also played for the Red Sox and Dodgers, putting together a career .285/.338/.411 line.