Few NHL teams have the quickness, speed, skill and depth to overwhelm the Tampa Bay Lightning, which the Pittsburgh Penguins have done through three games of the Eastern Conference finals.

Sidney Crosby, Evgeni Malkin and a talented supporting cast that includes the sizzling line of Phil Kessel, Carl Hagelin and Nick Bonino have outplayed the speedy Lightning for significant stretches of each game to gain a 2-1 lead in the best-of-seven matchup.

Game 4 is Friday night at Amalie Arena, and the Penguins are looking to turn up the pressure even more.

"When you're playing such good teams at this point, you know you can't afford to look past the game in front of you," said Crosby, who's scored the past two games after going eight straight without a goal.

Malkin assisted on Crosby's power-play goal that proved to be the winner in Game 3 on Wednesday night, Malkin's first point since Game 2 of Pittsburgh's second-round victory over Washington.

While the Penguins' biggest stars were trying to get back on track, Kessel, Hagelin and Bonino heated up at precisely the right time.

The trio had a huge impact Wednesday night, as well, with Kessel delivering his team-leading seventh goal of the playoffs off a nifty pass from Bonino after earlier setting up Hagelin's goal that snapped a scoreless tie.

"You don't win consistently without (depth). That line's been great all playoffs long," Crosby said. "You look at the way Phil's playing ... he creates so much. Haggy's got a ton of speed. And Bones is a really smart player. He works really well with those two guys. They've given us a lot of momentum."

Tampa Bay coach Jon Cooper acknowledged line has been tough matchup for a team that's accustomed to wearing opponents down with its own deep roster.

"You look at their team, Phil Kessel probably doesn't get near the respect he deserves. I mean, he's scored a ton of goals in this league. Bonino's kind of one of those underrated players. ... You look at the teams he's playing, and there's always been named stars ahead of him. Hagelin's won everywhere he's gone, the teams he's played on. But they get overshadowed by the big name guys," Cooper said.

"When you can go three and four lines deep — and something we've been able to do — it's a tough matchup for teams," the coach added. "They're just another case — and plus they're feeling it, too. They're in one of those playoff runs where they're feeling it, and when you are going like that, good things are going to happen for you."

The Penguins have outshot Tampa Bay 124-70, a trend the Lightning can't allow to continue if they expect to win the series.

Andrei Vasilevskiy has filled in admirably since replacing the injured goalie Ben Bishop during Tampa Bay's victory in Game 1. In addition to generating more scoring chances, Cooper stressed the Lightning also have to play better in front of Vasilevskiy, who faced 41 shots in Game 2 and 48 Wednesday night.

"That's unacceptable. I just feel bad for the kid that he's keeping us in there and we're not finding a way to bail him out," Cooper said. "The way things have gone these (last) two games, it doesn't matter who's in net. You know, we could have Bish and Vasi both playing at the same time, and they might have squeaked a couple in."

Tampa Bay won all three regular seasons meetings between the teams before taking Game 1 of this series on the road, so coaches and players say there's no need to panic.

Cooper reunited the "triplets" line of Tyler Johnson, Nikita Kucherov and Ondrej Palat during the third period of Game 3, and the trio that was instrumental to Tampa Bay's run to the Stanley Cup final a year ago produced two late goals.

Bishop practiced Thursday and said he remains hopeful he'll return at some point in the series. Cooper said he doesn't expect it to be for Game 4.

With Vasilevskiy playing as well as he has, and Tampa Bay's track record as a resilient team, the coach remains confident this still will be a "long, tough" series.

"It's not something where we're sitting here saying: 'Oh, we can't beat this team.' We couldn't beat them in the last two games, and that's the way we're looking at it," Cooper said.

"But in saying that, Pittsburgh's put us in a position to be like that," the coach added "Now it's we served, they volleyed back. Now it's our turn to send it back to them."