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Serena Williams writes she will return to Indian Wells after 14-year boycott

  • FILE - In this Sept. 11, 2011, file photo, Serena Williams gestures while talking to the chair umpire Eva Asderaki during the women's championship match at the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York. Williams says she will return to play in the tournament at Indian Wells, California next month after boycotting the event for 14 years. In an exclusive column for time.com, Williams writes about the jeering and booing and an 'undercurrent of racism" she felt during the 2001 semifinal and final. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)

    FILE - In this Sept. 11, 2011, file photo, Serena Williams gestures while talking to the chair umpire Eva Asderaki during the women's championship match at the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York. Williams says she will return to play in the tournament at Indian Wells, California next month after boycotting the event for 14 years. In an exclusive column for time.com, Williams writes about the jeering and booing and an 'undercurrent of racism" she felt during the 2001 semifinal and final. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this April 5, 2012, file photoo, Serena Williams gestures after a shot against Marina Erakovic, of New Zealand, during their match at the Family Circle Cup tennis tournament in Charleston, S.C. Williams says she will return to play in the tournament at Indian Wells, California next month after boycotting the event for 14 years. In an exclusive column for time.com, Williams writes about the jeering and booing and an 'undercurrent of racism" she felt during the 2001 semifinal and final. (AP Photo/Mic Smith, File)

    FILE - In this April 5, 2012, file photoo, Serena Williams gestures after a shot against Marina Erakovic, of New Zealand, during their match at the Family Circle Cup tennis tournament in Charleston, S.C. Williams says she will return to play in the tournament at Indian Wells, California next month after boycotting the event for 14 years. In an exclusive column for time.com, Williams writes about the jeering and booing and an 'undercurrent of racism" she felt during the 2001 semifinal and final. (AP Photo/Mic Smith, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Thursday, Jan. 29, 2015, file photo, Serena Williams, of the United States, waves after defeating compatriot Madison Keys during their semifinal match at the Australian Open tennis championship in Melbourne, Australia. Williams, the world's No. 1 women's tennis player, said Wednesday, Feb. 4, 2015, that she will play in the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells, Calif., next month, ending a personal boycott that began when she was booed at the 2001 event. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man, File)

    FILE - In this Thursday, Jan. 29, 2015, file photo, Serena Williams, of the United States, waves after defeating compatriot Madison Keys during their semifinal match at the Australian Open tennis championship in Melbourne, Australia. Williams, the world's No. 1 women's tennis player, said Wednesday, Feb. 4, 2015, that she will play in the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells, Calif., next month, ending a personal boycott that began when she was booed at the 2001 event. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man, File)  (The Associated Press)

Serena Williams says she will return to play in the tournament at Indian Wells, California, next month after boycotting the event for 14 years.

In a column for Time.com, Williams writes about the jeering and booing and an "undercurrent of racism" she felt during the 2001 semifinal and final.

Williams writes that with "a new understanding of the true meaning of forgiveness, that I will proudly return to Indian Wells in 2015."

After older sister Venus withdrew from the '01 semifinal against then 19-year-old Serena with an injury, the crowd booed. Serena wrote that there were allegations that matches between the sisters were fixed. In the final, against Kim Clijsters, the booing continued.

"In a game I loved with all my heart, at one of my most cherished tournaments, I suddenly felt unwelcome, alone and afraid," Serena writes in the column.

The tournament is scheduled for March 11-22.