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Ex-Trump adviser Carter Page met with Russian intel operative in 2013

The former foreign policy adviser denied allegations he colluded with Putin's government during the 2016 election; Catherine Herridge has the interview for 'Special Report'

 

Carter Page, a onetime foreign policy adviser to Donald Trump's presidential campaign, met with a Russian intelligence operative in 2013 and provided him documents about the energy industry, according to court documents filed Monday. 

The Russian, Victor Podobnyy, was one of three men charged in connection with a Cold War-style Russian spy ring. According to the documents, Podobnyy tried to recruit Page, an energy consultant working in New York at the time, as an intelligence source. Page is referred to in the filing as "Male-1."

Page was hired by the Trump campaign as a foreign policy adviser in March 2016, but left the campaign that September because, as he put it, "these stories kept coming out based on the dodgy dossier." Page was referencing a now-infamous file on Trump that was created by Christopher Steele, a former British MI-6 agent who was working for a U.S. political research group called Fusion GPS on behalf of both Republicans and Democrats.

EX-TRUMP ADVISER CARTER PAGE RIPS 'FALSE NARRATIVE' ON RUSSIA COLLUSION

Page is among the Trump associates under scrutiny as the FBI and the House and Senate intelligence committees investigate Russian interference in the 2016 campaign and possible ties between the Trump campaign and Moscow.

In an interview with Fox News last week, Page denied that he ever worked with Russian officials to help Trump's campaign, decrying stories to the contrary as "propaganda" driven by a "false narrative."

Page acknowledged in a statement Monday night that he "shared basic immaterial information and publicly available research documents" with Podobnyy. He described the information as "nothing more than a few samples from the far more detailed lectures" he delivered at New York University in 2013.

BuzzFeed News first reported on the filings.

Trump has vigorously denied that he or his associates were in contact with Russia during the election. He's blasted the focus on his possible Russia ties as a "ruse" and has insisted that the real story is the leaking of information to the media and allegations that he and his associates were improperly surveilled by the Obama administration.

"The real story turns out to be SURVEILLANCE and LEAKING! Find the leakers," Trump wrote in a tweet Monday morning.

The court filings include a transcript of Podobnyy speaking with Igor Sporyshev, who was also charged in the spy ring, about Page.

"I like that he takes on everything," Podobnyy says. "For now his enthusiasm works for me. I also promised him a lot."

Separately, The Washington Post reported Monday that the United Arab Emirates arranged a secret meeting in January between an American businessman supporting Trump and a Russian close to President Vladimir Putin as part of an apparent effort to establish a back-channel line of communication between Moscow and the incoming president.

Citing U.S., European and Arab officials, the Post reported that the UAE agreed to broker the meeting in part to explore whether Russia could be persuaded to curtail its relationship with Iran, including in Syria, a Trump administration objective that would be likely to require major concessions to Moscow on U.S. sanctions. The full agenda remains unclear, the newspaper said.

The meeting took place nine days before Trump's inauguration and involved businessman Erik Prince, the Post reported. Prince, the founder of the security firm Blackwater and now the head of the Hong Kong-based company Frontier Services Group, has ties to Trump chief strategist Steve Bannon and is the brother of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos.

U.S. officials said the FBI has been scrutinizing the meeting in the Seychelles islands in the Indian Ocean as part of the broader probe of Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. election and alleged contacts between associates of Putin and Trump, the Post reported. The FBI declined to comment, the newspaper said.

The officials said Prince presented himself as an unofficial envoy for the president-elect to high-ranking Emiratis involved in setting up his meeting with the Putin confidant, the Post reported. The officials did not identify the Russian.

Prince was a high-dollar campaign donor — he and his family reportedly gave more than $10 million to GOP candidates and super PACs in 2016 — and was a frequent critic of both President Barack Obama and Trump's opponent, Democrat Hillary Clinton.

In response to the Post story, White House press secretary Sean Spicer said "we are not aware of any meetings" and a Prince spokesman said the meeting "had nothing to do with President Trump." Both said Prince had no role in the Trump transition.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.